Saturday, March 25, 2017

NHS boss hails ‘gift’ of donated kidney after less than a year on transplant list

LONDON EVENING STANDARD | Ross Lydall

Matthew Hopkins calls kidney transplant an 'amazing gift' Glenn Copus
A hospital boss who underwent a kidney transplant after less than a year on the waiting list spoke today of the “amazing gift”.

Matthew Hopkins, 50, chief executive of Barking, Havering and Redbridge NHS trust, was selected for a “pre-emptive” operation months before he faced being placed on daily dialysis. A friend had volunteered to donate a kidney but another kidney, for which Mr Hopkins was a good match, became available after the death of a donor.

He had the procedure at St George’s hospital in Tooting this month, hours after receiving an early-morning phone call telling him an organ was available.

Kidney patients normally wait two and a half years for a transplant due to the shortage of donors. Last year 256 NHS patients died waiting for a kidney. Mr Hopkins said: “It’s an amazing gift. I just feel very, very lucky — and lucky from the point that it came so quickly. The normal waiting time is a minimum of two years.

“In other communities, such as the black community, where kidney disease is more prevalent, or for South-East Asians, there is an even longer waiting time. I’m going to be very sensible in making sure I look after this kidney.” Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

It Takes Guts

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO | Jackie Carr

Patient and Family Reunited With Liver Transplant Team

Five years ago, Monica Rossi Perackis’ vacation to the United States took an unexpected and fateful turn. On the eve of a visit to Disneyland with her family, Monica’s liver suddenly, completely failed.

Fortunately, the next stop for the mother of three from Italy was UC San Diego Health and the liver transplant team.

Pictured, (L-R): Antoinette Mantz, Dalia Iniguez, Joanie Salotti, Kelly Dobbins, Jackie Miranda, Dr. Alan Hemming, Monica Rossi Perackis, Michail Perackis, Cindy Cruz, and Doug Elmore.
“The first day that Monica opened her eyes after surgery, she asked me to kiss her. I will never forget that day,” said husband Michail.

Monica and Michail recently reunited with the transplant team to express their gratitude for the life-saving health care and hospitality they received.

“We found a great team with a great capacity for kindness. I wish we could name everyone, from Cindy Cruz to Cindy Collins, to Drs. Anderson, Napoles and Loomba. There was also Donovan, John, Maribel, Vito, Ernie, Vanessa and many others,” said Michail. “And, of course, Dr. Hemming, who physically saved my wife by transplanting her with a new liver.”

The Perackis family, who stayed at the Bannister Family House during her hospitalization, considered the liver transplant surgery a gift to their entire family. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

OneLegacy/Donate Life California teams up with Joey Gase

ESPN


Joey Gase and Jimmy Means Racing are excited to announce their partnership with OneLegacy and Donate Life California. Both OneLegacy and Donate Life California's logos will adorn the hood of the #52 Chevy driven by Gase for this weekend in Fontana to promote organ, eye, and tissue donation.

Joey's mother, Mary, passed away suddenly of a brain aneurysm in April 2011. Joey was just 18 at the time, and he and his family made the courageous decision to donate her organs. Mary's organs and tissue were able to save and improve the lives of 66 individuals. The experience sparked a fire in Joey to spread awareness and the importance of organ, eye and tissue donation each week while on the track.

Jimmy Means Racing will also host and honor Alex Guedea's family in Fontana. Guedea's life ended early on June 19, 2012, when he was pronounced brain dead and the impossible became real at the young age of 21. Guedea always loved seeing other people laughing and enjoying life. He enjoyed making people smile and would do anything to see them happy. For his family, the decision to donate was easy, based on the life Alex had lived, and knowing he would want to be allowed to give a life-saving gift to others. "We know there are others who are alive today because of the gift of his heart, liver and his kidney," said his family. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

In Memoriam: Aaron D. Bannett, M.D., MBA

GIFT OF LIFE DONOR PROGRAM

Thank you for visiting Gift of Life Donor Program in celebration of the memory of Dr. Aaron Bannet, co-founder of our organization. If you would like to make a memorial contribution in honor of Dr. Bannett, please click here.

Pictured (l to r): Howard M. Nathan, President & CEO, Gift of Life Donor Program; Dr. Clyde Barker, Co-Founder, Gift of Life Donor Program; Dr. Aaron Bannett, Co-Founder Gift of Life Donor Program; Glen D. Moffett, Esq., Immediate Past Chair, Gift of Life Donor Program Governing Board.
"Dr. Bannett was a true innovator in donation and transplantation with a passion for advancing medicine and science. He was dearly loved by his patients and colleagues not only for his surgical skill and expertise but his care and compassion. He was a true mentor to many. Dr. Bannett's family requested to have the service at Gift of Life Donor Program." - Howard M. Nathan, President & CEO, Gift of Life Donor Program 
Aaron D. Bannett, M.D., MBA, was a pioneer in organ transplant and vascular surgery. In the early days of vascular surgery, he trained with Drs. DeBakey and Cooley in Houston and then began a vascular graft program at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. Once the technique of sewing blood vessels was perfected, and an active practice of vascular surgery was established, Dr. Bannett, an early member of the Vascular Society, began research on kidney transplants in the animal laboratory.

In 1965 and 1966, the first kidney transplants were done at Einstein, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann Hospital. Dr. Bannett started the transplant program and served as the Director of the Organ Transplant Program at Albert Einstein Medical Center from 1966 until his retirement in 1989. Dr. Bannett then developed the concept of a national transplant society and was a founding member of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. The Society started with 127 members and now has nearly 2,000 members with over 5,000 attending the annual meeting. He was Chairman of Surgery at Einstein from 1972-1979. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Double lung transplant gives Que. woman new lease on life

CTV NEWS.ca


A Montreal woman who is recovering from a double lung transplant is hoping to raise awareness about the disease that nearly killed her and the need to sign organ donor cards.

Three years ago, after Linda Paradis began to experience pain while taking deep breaths, she knew something was wrong.

Doctors tested her for several conditions for close to a year before finally diagnosing her with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis -- a condition that doctors still don’t understand well.

IPF causes scar tissue, or fibrosis, to build up in the lungs, shrinking their oxygen-intake abilities. Doctors don’t know what causes it, which is why it’s called idiopathic, says respirologist Dr. Julie Morisset, who specializes in IPF.

“Right now, the hypothesis that we have is that it's related to aging of the cells in the lungs. Because those cells are aging they can die out and all those cells create scarring in the lung and the lung gets really stiff,” she says.

It took a year for doctors to finally diagnose Paradis in part because IPF is so hard to detect. The symptoms of shortness of breath and coughing are common to many lung diseases, so narrowing in on the cause is difficult, says Morriset. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

After donating kidney, Cordasco encourages others to become donors

DAILY PRESS | Travis Fain

Heather Cordasco, left, and Mary Stokes have known each other for about eight years. Cordasco recently donated a kidney to Stokes. (Judith Lowery/Daily Press)
There was never any doubt, Heather Cordasco said, about giving up a kidney.

Without it, her friend would have to depend on dialysis, sitting for hours to have a machine to clean her blood. The yellow pallor would remain, along with all the health risks. Mary Stokes would have to hope it wouldn't take years to move up the transplant waiting list.

"She said, 'I can't ask you to do that,'" said Cordasco, now nearly four weeks removed from a successful transplant surgery. "I said, 'You didn't ask me.'"

Cordasco and Stokes have known each other about 8 years. Cordasco is a former Williamsburg-James City County School Board member and Stokes is a special education assistant for the system. Stokes has three kidneys now: her two and the one from Cordasco's left side, which Stokes calls "super kidney."

"I can never thank her enough," she said. Continue reading
__________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

UWA to celebrate National Organ Donor Month with Alabama Organ Center

THE MERIDIAN STAR



LIVINGSTON, Ala. – The University of West Alabama will help kick off National Organ Donor Month in April with a guest speaker from the Alabama Organ Center (AOC). The event is set for April 5 at 3:30 p.m. at the Tutwiler Conference Center in Lyon Hall and is open to the public.

Amy Woodward will represent the education team of the AOC. Amy works in hospital development and as a community liaison for the center, traveling across Alabama to share the organization’s mission of instilling hope within the people of Alabama by providing education and confidence to take action to become an organ and tissue donor.

According to Woodward, more than 3,000 Alabamians are waiting for a transplant as of early February. Of these, 2,909 are waiting for a kidney. The liver is the second-most needed transplant organ in Alabama, with 86 on the waiting list. Six people need a pancreas, 14 need both a kidney and pancreas, 38 need a heart, 18 need a lung, and two await a heart and lung. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Jason Ray, UNC mascot and organ donor, left behind a legacy of life

THE NEWS AND OBSERVER | Andrew Carter

Jason Ray, dressed as Rameses the mascot for the University of North Carolina, is shown Feb. 13, 2007, in Chapel Hill, N.C. Ray died after being hit by a car March 23, 2007, in Fort Lee, N.J. Edythe McNamee AP

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/acc/unc/article140586523.html#storylink=cpy
A card arrived less than two weeks ago at the home of Charlotte and Emmitt Ray, and when they opened the envelope there was David Erving, a wide smile, wearing “little green glasses,” as Charlotte described them. A homemade St. Patrick’s Day card. Erving never misses a holiday.

He never goes more than a couple of weeks or so without calling, either, just to check in, to hear the voices of the people whose son saved his life. Ten years ago, Erving, 49, was ready to die.

He’d been on dialysis for a decade. Diabetes had ravaged his body, cost him an eye, caused his leg to break. He needed a new liver and a new pancreas. He’d been on a transplant list for four years. He’d decided to stop dialysis, and prepared himself for the end.

Now he’s alive because Jason Ray, the only child Charlotte and Emmitt had together, died 10 years ago on Sunday. Jason was a senior at North Carolina, where before home football and basketball games he transformed into Rameses, the Tar Heels’ muscular mascot.

He traveled with the team to New Jersey for the 2007 NCAA tournament. Hours before a game against Southern California Jason walked out of the hotel in search of a snack. He never returned. An SUV struck him on the side of Route 4 in Fort Lee. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Allexis Siebrecht, liver transplant recipient, hoping to raise money to go to international transplant games

CBC NEWS MANITOBA | Aiden Geary

Allexis Siebrecht is stronger and healthier nearly two years after receiving a life-saving liver transplant at Toronto's Sick Kids hospital. (CBC)
Almost two years after receiving a life-saving liver transplant, 13-year-old Allexis Siebrecht is hoping to represent Manitoba at an international athletic competition for kids who have received organ transplants.

Allexis was born with biliary atresia, a rare liver disease that meant she needed a new liver at age 11.

Before the transplant, the condition meant even things as simple as breathing were difficult for her, but not anymore, Allexis says.

"Before I had my transplant I felt, like, really tired, and I felt like I couldn't walk up any stairs. I was getting sick a lot," she said. "And now I'm just active and hyper and running and doing all these sports."

Last year, she competed in the Canadian Transplant Games and brought home some serious hardware — nine medals in swimming, badminton, tennis and track and field. The wins also meant she qualified for this year's World Transplant Games in Malaga, Spain, where she would be the only Manitoba competitor. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Organ donation plea: Little Leo’s ‘horror race against time’

COURIER MAIL | Jackie Sinnerton

Five-month-old Leo Nairn with his mother Kimberly and father Matthew who are desperate to find him a liver. Picture: Jamie Hanson
SOMETIMES superheroes are not invincible. Little Leo Nairn has only months to live if he doesn’t get a liver transplant.

His parents are so frantic to save the five-month-old, they have offered to donate part of their livers, but the live donor mortality rate is very high and doctors say it would be a last resort.

“Why does it have to be a last resort? What if a compatible organ doesn’t arrive on time? It should be the parents’ decision,” mum Kimberly Nairn said. “I’m watching my beautiful boy fade away. He is critical now and vomiting up all his meds. It is a horror race against time.”

Leo has biliary atresia, a rare disease that destroys the bile ducts. The 20-year survival rate for transplant patients is 80 per cent. More than one person will die every week waiting for an organ, with 1500 people on the transplant waiting list.

Many desperate parents offer to be donors but hospitals are reluctant because of the risk to the parent. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Most Heart And Lung Donations Never Make It To A Patient, But Science May Have A Fix

COURIOSITY

In the efforts to get more people to become organ donors, one sad fact looms large: a large percentage of donated organs must be discarded before they ever reach a patient. Luckily, a new method developed by a team of University of Minnesota researchers may be able to change that.



Why we're covering this: 
  • It's important—this new development could affect the hundreds of thousands of people currently on organ transplant waiting lists, including you or someone you love.
  • It's amazing how many obstacles there are to organ transplantation that we just don't think about.
Nothing Lasts Forever

There are many hurdles on the road to receiving a life-saving organ transplant: a measly half of adults are registered organ donors, the wait list is so long that 22 people die every day while waiting for a donation, and even if an organ is donated, that doesn't mean it'll make it to a patient in need. More than 60 percent of hearts and lungs are discarded before transplantation. That's partially because you can only keep these delicate organs on ice for a maximum of four hours. That period is slightly longer for more hardier organs like livers and intestines (8–12 hours) and kidneys (36 hours), but even still, as many as 18 percent of kidneys are discarded before they can save a life, often because of that short storage window. According to one estimate, if we were able to use just half of the hearts and lungs we currently discard, we could get to the end of the organ donation wait list in as little as two years.

We do have ways of preserving organs in the long term, but they've got some problems. Our best hope for long-term organ preservation is vitrification, a process that cools them to such low temperatures that their liquid essentially becomes glass. The issue, as anyone who's tried to microwave a year-old TV dinner can attest, is in the reheating process. The current "gold standard" for rewarming, according to the researchers, is convection, but that has only worked for very tiny samples. Anything larger than a few millimeters, and you get uneven warming that creates too much mechanical stress, resulting in cells that crack and crystallize. That often causes major damage that leaves potentially life-saving tissues completely unusableContinue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

Friday, March 24, 2017

Steve Jobs’ liver—and the quest for a better organ algorithm

ARS TECHNICA | Mallory Locklear

The legacy system is inefficient, but can equations overcome emotions?

As Stephen Merritt once sang, "I think I need a new heart."/ GettyImages
In 2009, Steve Jobs received a liver transplant—not in northern California where he lived, but across the country in Memphis, Tennessee. Given the general complications of both travel and a transplant, Jobs’ decision may seem like an odd choice. But it was a strategic move that almost certainly got him a liver much more quickly than if Jobs had just waited for a liver to become available in California. Eight years later, the Apple founder’s procedure continues to highlight the state of transplants in the US: when it comes to organs, we have a big math problem.

Today, there’s a much greater need than there are organs to go around. It’s a problem currently being tackled in part by mathematicians and developers, who are crafting clever algorithms that aim to make organ allocation as fair as possible. But it’s complicated math that’s done against a backdrop of sticky ethical issues, and the debates surrounding it are heated and contentious.

The problem(s)

Before we can understand how researchers are using math to take on the bigger issues plaguing organ allocation, we have to understand what those issues are and where current strategies—mathematical or otherwise—have failed.

Organs are allocated differently depending on the organ. For hearts and lungs, the time between organ procurement and transplantation has to be kept very short. So, a recipient is first searched for within a limited radius from the donor hospital. If no suitable person is found, the radius is extended out. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

St. Tammany 'Deputy of the Year' donates kidney, saves child's life in 2016

NOLA | THE TIMES-PICAYUNE | Jan Lugenbuhl

The St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office designated Deputy Robert "Andre" Ardeneaux, Jr. as Deputy of the Year. (Courtesy of the St. Tammanany Parish Sheriff's Office) (St. Tammanany Parish Sheriff's O)
There are a lot of reasons why the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office designated Deputy Robert "Andre" Ardeneaux, Jr. as Deputy of the Year.

Within the space of a year - 2016 - Ardeneaux faced a remarkable series of challenges and met them with aplomb, including voluntarily participating in flood rescues, sustaining on-the-job injuries, and saving his toddler son's life.

While valiant, all that falls into the typical life of a law enforcement officer. But Ardeneaux stepped outside the line of duty when he donated a kidney to a wounded deputy in another parish.

The kicker is when Ardeneaux considered organ donation, he didn't know his kidney would go to a fellow officer.

The situation came about when a friend of his had been tested as a kidney-donor match, with the friend's mother-in-law being the possible recipient. This selfless gesture appealed to Ardeneaux. Ardeneaux too decided to be tested. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

The Path to a Kidney Transplant: Following Georges' Lead

RED TRUCK CATCHER

Georges Annan Kingsley with son, Joseph, and wife, Marthe (R), and Bernie Michel (L)
For people on the list to receive a kidney transplant the path is long and arduous, marked with anxiety and frustration. As one would expect for anyone with a serious chronic illness personal and family stress is high, often debilitating.

In January I wrote about Georges Annan Kingsley's desperate need for a kidney transplant, and his leadership in promoting the need for more people to become Living Donor Champions. My blog today features Bernie Michel's story as he follows Georges' lead to learn more about living donor programs, and the possibility of becoming a kidney donor. Like Georges, Bernie is an Asylum Hill resident. He is a long time community leader active in the Asylum Hill Neighborhood Association(AHNA). Let's follow this stonecatcher's journey. I will feature Bernie's updates in future blogposts as he walks us along the living organ donor path.

George Needs A Kidney
by Bernie Michel

For those of you who are regulars at AHNA meetings, or the Welcoming Committee or who read the RedTruckStonecatcher.com blog, it is no secret that Georges Annan Kingsley, the refugee and artist from Ivory Coast who has been on dialysis for more than five years, needs a kidney transplant. He began last month explaining the process to me, and so my commitment, at least at first was to understand the process, what is really involved. I’m going to share here, as long as necessary, what I learned. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.
___________________________________________________________________

North Boone High School alums reunited over kidney donation

WREX | Mary Sugden


Rockford (WREX), A reunion between high school classmates could end up saving one of their lives. When Vicki Flanders learned her husband Gary needed a kidney transplant, she took to Facebook.

"I thought what could it hurt,I just put it out there."

She let friends know Gary has Polycystic Kidney Disease, or PKD. It causes cysts to grow around his kidneys, which have ballooned to about 35 pounds. Vicki's post let friends know Gary needed an organ donor with O positive blood. Little did the couple know someone was paying attention hundreds of miles away.

"I started out reading her post on Facebook," says Terry Johnson. "When I read it was O positive blood the first thing I thought was well, I've got O positive blood."

Johnson was a classmate of the couple at North Boone High School. The trio lost touch over the years, only seeing one another at class reunions. Terry now lives in Tennessee, but years ago, he and Gary were neighbors. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave

Local teen awaits a heart

SIDNEY DAILY NEWS | Patricia Anne Speelman


CINCINNATI — Hayden Weiskittel, 15, is like most other Anna High School freshmen.

He has Lego sets he likes to create things with. He enjoys playing with his two dogs. He loves video games and having fun on the computer.

There’s just one thing he’s missing: a healthy heart.

The son of Christa and Scott Weiskittel, of Anna, is on the waiting list for a heart transplant. He’s been hospitalized at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital since Feb. 8, but his heart problems date back to the day he was born.

He came into the world with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, Christa said. That’s a congenital heart defect in which the left side of Hayden’s heart was not sufficiently developed to function properly.

He underwent surgery within his first two days of life and another two reconstructive surgeries before he was 2. The procedures were designed to “make what he had work for him,” Christa said. He has two chambers in his heart. Most people have four.

“We knew eventually he’d be on the transplant list and now he is,” Christa added. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave

A good call: Cottage Grove man gives kidney to fellow umpire

SOUTH WASHINGTON COUNTY BULLETIN | Blaze Fugina

Cottage Grove’s David Watkins (left) is receiving the gift of a new kidney from fellow umpire Nate Gabrelcik. (Bulletin photo by Blaze Fugina)
Umpiring has been an escape for Cottage Grove's David Watkins.

Watkins has been battling kidney failure for the past decade, the result of a disease which cost him his career in Florida working on helicopters with the U.S. Department of Defense. While he no longer can work, Watkins has stayed active by umpiring softball games for the Cottage Grove Athletic Association and other tournaments in the region.

"I called ball in Florida, but I really started calling it a lot harder to keep myself busy and to stay in shape," said Watkins, who moved from Florida to Minnesota after meeting his wife, Cheryl Watkins. Continue reading
___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave

Live kidney donors are in high demand in Washington state

THE SPOKESMAN REVIEW | Pia Hallenberg

Shelby Whitson recieves dialysis at Fresenious Dialysis in Spokane Valley on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)

Shelby Whitson needs a kidney. But so do more than 1,600 other people in Washington, and there’s never enough to go around. 

Whitson was diagnosed with hereditary kidney disease at 15. Now at 32 she jokes that her family has some kind of record of kidney disease treatment at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center: her grandfather died from kidney disease and her mother, an aunt and an uncle all have it. 

“It’s on my mom’s side of the family,” Whitson said. “There was a 50-50 chance that I’d get it, but it usually doesn’t come out until later in life.”

The first sign that something was wrong were debilitating migraines. Whitson went to see a doctor who discovered her blood pressure was very high. 

“It was 200 over something. It was at stroke level,” Whitson said. 

More tests revealed what she and her family feared – there was something wrong with her kidneys. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave

San Antonio Live Donor Kidney Transplant Program Ranked #1 In The Country

PR NEWSWIRE

SAN ANTONIO, March 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Texas Transplant Institute at Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital ranks first in the nation for the number of live donor kidney transplants performed in 2016. According to data from the national United Network for Organ Sharing, the program performed 202 live donor kidney transplants in 2016. With this milestone, the San Antonio program became the first ever to perform more than 200 live donor kidney transplants in one year. The private community hospital's transplant teams also set program records for deceased donor kidney transplants (158) and for liver transplants (64).

"Every transplant impacts multiple human beings. It gives the recipients and their families a new lease on life," said Adam Bingaman, M.D., kidney and pancreas transplant surgeon and the director of Abdominal Organ Transplantation, Live Donor Kidney Transplant, and Renal Transplant Research Programs. "And it gives the donors a new perspective: they've just saved someone's life." Continue reading 

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

The Organ Project announces Gala sell out

PR NEWSWIRE


TORONTO, March 23, 2017 /CNW/ - The Organ Project (@theorganproject) announced today it has sold out its Inaugural Gala taking place in Toronto at The Fairmont Royal York on March 31, 2017. The Gala will bring attention to the organ transplant waitlist problem that currently exists throughout Canada and the United States.

"I am overwhelmed by the support for The Organ Project. It's wonderful that so many people across Canada and the United States. want to join me in eliminating the waitlist," said Founder and Chairman Eugene Melnyk (@MelnykEugene). "This is truly a solvable problem. It's about education, registration, and donation. It only takes 2 minutes to register and that could be the difference in saving someone's life."

The Gala will feature a 5-star program including 7-time Grammy Award Winner Carrie Underwood. In addition to the entertainment, there will be a live auction that will include luxurious vacations, retreats, and elite sporting packages. The program will also include guest speakers from the transplant community and The Organ Project will debut three television commercials aimed at building greater awareness and action to support organ donation. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California
Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.

This lucky mum’s story to feature in organ campaign

DUBLIN PEOPLE
Gina’s story will be featured as part of this year’s campaign.
THE story of a 51-year-old Southside mother who narrowly survived a devastating heart attack will be featured as part of this year’s Organ Donor Awareness Week.

Running from April 1 to 8 this year, the campaign will be launched on Tuesday, March 28 at the Mansion House.

One of those whose life has been saved by an organ transplant, Gina Lenehan, from Ranelagh, will be on hand to help highlight the importance of the campaign.

Gina, a pharmacist at Trinity Pharmacy in Westland Row, received a heart transplant in 2015. The mother of three teenagers had not been on a heart waiting list as she was in good health.

She had no prior warning signs that she was about to suffer spontaneous heart dissection which, as she says, shredded her heart. Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California

Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.

Organ donations by Elsie Mahe featured in I-15 freeway billboard tribute by Kidney Foundation

DESERET NEWS | Dick Herman


The legacy of departed Elsie Mahe received a tender extension on Thursday when The National Kidney Foundation of Utah and Idaho raised an I-15 billboard in her honor — and it caught her mother Sunny by surprise.

Elsie, age 3, died after a tragic home accident just before Thanksgiving this past fall and her story and subsequent donation of her organs by her family has inspired many. She is the daughter of BYU assistant football coach Reno Mahe, and his wife, a former all-conference volleyball star.

The billboard, which is located on the west side of I-15 near her home in Lehi, was designed with the tribute of honoring her sacrifice with also crediting her for saving the lives of five people.

“When Reno Mahe saw the design, his face just lit up," said Kidney Foundation of Utah and Idaho CEO Deen Vetterli. "He then said he wanted it to be a surprise to his wife and family after Reno drove her by the billboard Thursday." Continue reading

___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California

Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.

Once strangers, 2 Duke Energy colleagues bond over kidney transplant

THE CINCINNATI INQUIRER | Keith Biery Golic

Jerry Kurdilla recovers from complications after donating a kidney last year.(Photo: Provided/Jerri Kurdilla)
Kidney donor: ‘Am I dying?’

There was a tube down her throat and another one up her nose.

Doctors strapped her down, they said, so she wouldn’t rip them out.

She felt like she was drowning.

Almost a month before, Jerri Kurdila had donated one of her kidneys to a stranger. The Trenton resident was released from the hospital, but threw up 14 times in a little more than a day when she got home.

Back at the hospital, doctors eventually forced Kurdila into a coma after her she developed an infection, her lung collapsed and she got pneumonia. Friends and family had to wear hospital gowns and masks to visit.

When she woke up, she couldn’t talk. She also couldn't drink.

Her husband Mike brought in an orange pop, her favorite kind. She wrote him a note, asking for a sip, even though she knew she couldn't.

Later, she wrote him another note:

“Am I dying?”

Her husband looked at the note and then back at her. Continue reading


___________________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
Please register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Donate LIFE California | Done VIDA California

Nationwide:
Organ Donor | Donate Life America

To ensure your gift of life is honored, please share your decision with your family. At risk is the legacy you wish to leave.

Why Manitoba's organ donations doubled in 2 years

CBC NEWS MANITOBA

'Tell your family what you want,' U of M critical care program director urges

Manitobans can declare end of life organ donation wishes on the Sign Up for Life website at signupforlife.ca. (Shutter stock)

The number of organ donations more than doubled in two years in the province, but many Manitobans continue to decline end-of-life donation requests on behalf of family members because they haven't discussed the idea.

Thanks to a mandatory referral policy introduced in 2014 by the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, donations rose from 35.1 per cent that year to 74.3 per cent in 2016.

"Our target is 90 per cent and beyond and we are working hard with our hospital partners to achieve this goal," Dr. Adrian Robertson, medical director of the Gift of Life program, said in a statement.

The mandatory policy made it routine for medical professionals working in intensive care units and emergency rooms to notify Transplant Manitoba's Gift of Life program about a suitable donor whose family had decided to pull life support. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Nationwide:
To ensure donation happens, please share your decision with your family. At stake is the legacy you wish to leave.

Donor Alliance CEO Sue Dunn Elected Vice President/President-Elect Of OPTN/UNOS Board Of Directors

PR NEWSWIRE

DENVER, March 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Sue Dunn, RN, B.S.N, M.B.A., has been elected vice president/president-elect of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) board of directors. She is president and chief executive officer of Donor Alliance, the federally designated nonprofit that facilitates organ and tissue donation in Colorado and most of Wyoming.

"For more than three decades I have dedicated myself to the lifesaving work of organ donation," said Ms. Dunn. "My passion for this privileged job has never wavered, and I am invigorated by what lies ahead. In this new role, I will vigorously and enthusiastically drive forward the mission of advancing organ availability and transplantation."

Dunn will serve a one-year term beginning July 1, 2017; she will then become the board's president in July 2018. As vice president/president-elect, she will also serve as vice chair of the OPTN/UNOS Executive Committee and UNOS' Corporate Affairs Committee. Continue reading

_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Nationwide:
To ensure donation happens, please share your decision with your family. At stake is the legacy you wish to leave.

A heart-wrenching story by Southwest Airlines

TRAVEL DAILY NEWS INTERNATIONAL | Alex Chourupa


A grandfather’s wife made a desperate call to Southwest Airlines to organize a last-minute flight ticket, describing a crisis circumstance:

A grandfather urgently needed to fly from a corporate trip in Los Angeles to his daughter’s home in Denver to live the very last moments with a person he loved: his three-year-old grandson who was in a coma after having been beaten to death by his mother’s boyfriend. The little boy would be taken off life support at 9 p.m. that night, donating his organs to save over 25 lives. 

A big delay on road and airport made the man almost miss the flight scheduled at 11: 50. At 12:02, 12 minutes after the supposed departure flight time, the pilot, having held the plane, welcomed the grandfather to the waiting plane: “Are you Mark? We held the plane for you and we’re so sorry about the loss of your grandson.” 

Mark, walking down the jetway with the pilot, told him: “I can’t thank you enough for this” to receive once more his generous response: “They can’t go anywhere without me, and I wasn’t going anywhere without you. Now relax. We’ll get you there. And again, I’m so sorry.” Continue reading

_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Nationwide:
To ensure donation happens, please share your decision with your family. At stake is the legacy you wish to leave.

Doc, patient recall heart transplant surgery 30 years later

INSIDER LOUISVILLE | Boris Ladwig

A photo from the state’s first heart transplant, completed by a team at Jewish Hospital in 1984. | Courtesy of KentuckyOne Health.
Kathy Anderson had just given life to two girls — but she was dying.

Anderson, of Brandenburg, Ky., was 20 when she delivered twin girls on March 17, 1987, but a deteriorating heart muscle had reduced the organ’s function to about 2 percent.

“She was in the process of dying,” said Dr. Laman A. Gray Jr., a former heart surgeon who today is the executive and medical director of the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute in Louisville.

Gray helped establish the heart transplant program in Louisville in the mid-1980s. Jewish Hospital was the state’s first institution to be designated as a federally approved heart, liver, lung and kidney transplant center.

On April 16, Anderson will celebrate the 30th anniversary of her heart transplant — together with her daughters, their husbands and her five grandchildren.

Anderson, now 50, recently told Insider that her pregnancy had worsened her cardiomyopathy, a weak and deteriorating heart muscle. The heart was not pumping enough blood, and she had trouble breathing.

It got to the point where she could not swallow and became disoriented.

“It was horrible,” Anderson recalled. “(It’s) the weakest you can be without being dead.” Continue reading

_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Nationwide:
To ensure donation happens, please share your decision with your family. At stake is the legacy you wish to leave.

Syracuse teen police say hit by D.A.'s office investigator dies

SYRACUSE | Ken Sturtz

Seth Collier, 18, of Syracuse, was hospitalized after a hit-and-run early Tuesday on the North Side of Syracuse. Collier died Thursday. Peter J. Rauch, 37, of Liverpool, was charged with leaving the scene of a personal injury accident with serious physical injuries. He was an investigator with the Onondaga County District Attorney's Office but was fired Tuesday hours after the crash. (Provided photo)
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- An 18-year-old who was critically injured early Tuesday in a hit-and-run on the city's North Side has died.

Seth Collier died Thursday afternoon, according to Oswego County District Attorney Greg Oakes, who has been named as a special prosecutor in the case.

Collier was walking at North Salina and Bear streets around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday when he was hit by a car that did not stop, police said. He was rushed to Upstate University Hospital where he had remained since.

His sister had previously said Collier was being kept alive on life support so loved ones could say goodbye and his organs could be donated.

Collier's family released a statement following his death Thursday saying he had been surrounded by loved ones.

"We thank all our friends and family and many individuals who we never knew for their support and prayers," the statement said. "So that Seth may live on and help others, we are donating his organs." Continue reading

_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
Nationwide:
To ensure donation happens, please share your decision with your family. At stake is the legacy you wish to leave.