DL Life Logo March 25,2015 - - - - 123,231 AMERICANS ARE CANDIDATES ON THE UNOS TRANSPLANT WAIT LIST DL Life Logo 101,699 waiting for a kidney DL Life Logo 15,289 wait-listed for a liver DL Life Logo 1,078 waiting for a pancreasDL Life Logo 2,009 needing a Kidney-PancreasDL Life Logo 4,096 waiting for a life-saving heartDL Life Logo 1,609 waiting for a lungDL Life Logo 39 waiting for a heart-lungDL Life Logo 243 waiting for small bowelDL Life Logo One organ donor has the opportunity to save up to 8 lives DL Life Logo One tissue donor has the opportunity to save and -or enhance the lives of 50 or more individuals DL Life Logo An average of 21 people die everyday while waiting for a transplant. DL Life Logo You have the power to SAVE Lives by becoming an organ, eye and tissue donor, so what are you waiting for? To learn how to register click HEREDL Life Logo

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Eight years ago today, at only 21 years old, Jason Ray saved lives through organ and tissue donation.

Donate Life America

Eight years ago today, at only 21 years old, Jason Ray saved lives through organ and tissue donation. 

As college basketball teams across the country get ready to compete in the #Sweet16 today, help us honor Jason and his heroic decision to register as a donor by sharing his story and registering as an organ, eye and tissue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjQduVJCJUs #DonateLife #MarchMadness

Joseph Middlemiss' Big Heart will beat in every stride of his Dracut dad's Boston Marathon

Lowell Sun | Alana Melanson
Scott Middlemiss, with his son Jack, and photo of his son, Joseph Middlemiss, is training to run the Boston Marathon next month for the charity in his late son's name, the Joseph Middlemiss Big Heart Foundation. Sun / Bob Whitaker

DRACUT -- When he runs the Boston Marathon for the first time next month, Scott Middlemiss will be doing it for his heart angel and his heart warrior.

Middlemiss, along with his wife, Kate, began the Joseph Middlemiss Big Heart Foundation following the death of their eldest son, Joe, at age 6 on Sept. 23, 2013, due to complications from cardiomyopathy, or an enlarged heart. Thirty-three days before his death, the Middlemisses welcomed their second son, Jack, who suffers from the same condition.

Since then, they've been on a mission to spread both Joe's message of kindness and living life to the fullest and awareness about the foundation and cardiomyopathy to help Jack and other kids like him. Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
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EXCLUSIVE: Two New York moms get kidneys from other families' kids

New York Daily News | Meredith Engel
CHRISTIE M FARRIELLA/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Pauline Powell (left) with her kidney donor Brandon Garrett (2nd from left) and Garrett’s mother Edmonia with Sedicah Powell.


A pair of New York families will be forever intertwined after two kind-hearted children became kidney donors for each other's mothers.

The quartet of donors and recipients took part in the first-ever internal kidney swap at Montefiore Hospital — saving two lives in the process.

Pauline Powell, 56, was in desperate need of a kidney. The mental-health worker from Mount Vernon was heartbroken when her 23-year-old daughter, Fordham University student Sedicah Powell, turned out not to be a match.

Without a healthy donor, Powell would have to endure years of waiting and dialysis. She was told the wait could be five to seven years for a new organ. Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Table tennis tourneys in memory of Jonathon Talbot raise organ donation awareness

Inside Toronto | Scarborough Mirror| By Andrew Palamarchuk
Table tennis tourneys in memory of Jonathon Talbot raise organ donation awareness.
Photo/COURTESY
Two table tennis tourneys will be held this spring in memory of Scarborough's Jonathon Talbot, and to help raise awareness for organ donation.


Two table tennis tournaments will honour a young Scarborough man who gave the gift of life. The events will also raise awareness of organ donation so more lives can be saved.

Jonathon Talbot, 22, passed away March 10, 2009, two days after being in a car crash on Hill Crescent in Guildwood. But his organs and tissues continue to live on in at least two people.

Ontario has a 26 per cent registered organ donor rate, but the number drops to 11 per cent in Scarborough.

“I really feel grateful that Jonathon did register and that I know he’s living on in other people,” Jonathon’s mother Heather said. “And it’s not just the one person who gets the organ, it’s all of their friends and family who benefit from having that person still alive.” Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Passionate stories shared at organ donor awareness ceremony

Cambridge Times | Lisa Rutledge
Flag raising ceremony helps raise awareness about organ donations

Lisa Rutledge, Times Staff
Janine Thompson helps raise the beadonor.ca flag at Cambridge city hall Friday (March 27).

Girl in need of a heart, daughter whose father was organ donor give testimony on how donations save live

CAMBRIDGE – Two people, one waiting for a new heart, another whose love for her deceased father lives on in those who received his organs, gave passionate testimony during an organ donor awareness flag-raising ceremony yesterday (March 27).

On one side of the spectrum there’s Natalie Ferry, a 16-year-old Grade 11 student, who needs a new heart – the left side too small and too weak. On the other, there’s Janine Thompson, who was left making one of the hardest, but hope-filled decisions of her lifetime – signing the organ donor consent form on her father’s behalf. Three male organ donor recipients are living better lives because of his gifts.

Although their perspectives were different in the extreme, their messages were much the same, and were shared with those gathered for the second annual beadonor.ca flag raising ceremony at Cambridge city hall Friday. Continue reading 
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Why organ donation is especially critical for ethnic minorities

Alabama | Alabama Media Group Marketing Staff
Image: Shuterstock

While it's important for everyone to understand the benefits of organ donation, for a variety of reasons, it can be especially critical for ethnic minorities to consider donation.

"It's really important for ethnic minorities to become organ and tissue donors," says Beverly Berry, the multi-cultural education coordinator for the Alabama Organ Center (AOC).

"Minorities are more affected by diabetes and high blood pressure," explains Berry. "These two chronic diseases can ultimately lead to kidney failure, and when those diseases lead to kidney failure, (ethnic minorities) are more at risk of needing a kidney transplant."

Berry is quick to point out that ethnicity isn't necessarily a road block to receiving an organ, but there are certain factors that make it easier to receive an organ from someone of the same ethnicity.

"That's not to say an African American couldn't receive an organ from a Caucasian," Berry added. "But research has shown that when a person of the same ethnicity receives that organ, it's more successful." Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Organ donation: How little Ethan gave life to others

News Australia
Ethan Seccull died after being hit by a train. Source: Supplied

A LITTLE over three years ago, Jon and Michelle Seccull found themselves in a heartwrenching situation. Their gorgeous three-year-old toddler had been hit by a train, and was in hospital in a critical condition.

“It was in late 2011 and we were living in a little rural property in Victoria,” Jon explains to news.com.au. “My son Ethan loved watching the trains going past, and he decided to climb the back fence and wave to the train. He was struck by that train and airlifted to the Royal Children’s Hospital.

“The surgeons worked gallantly. After two hours they delivered the news that Ethan’s brain injury was as such that we he wouldn’t recover from it. My wife and I were standing beside him and we just looked at each other and said, what wouldn’t we give to be given something that helps him live.


“Ethan’s life support was turned off. People don’t want to think of children dying, but it does happen.Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Panel to discuss organ donation and religion

Dessert News
Lori Haglund lays a flower at the glass wall of The Celebration of Life Donor Monument at the Salt Lake Main Library, Tuesday, April 30, 2013. The wall bears names of people who donated organs, eyes, tissue and blood.  Ravell Call, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — Leaders from various religions throughout Utah will be coming together to celebrate National Donate Month and to clarify their religion’s position on organ donation.

A panel discussion/public press conference will be held on Friday, April 1, 10 a.m., at the Salt Lake Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Conference Room B, Level 1.

“We have found that all faiths are interested in saving lives,” said Alex McDonald, director of public education/public relations for Intermountain Donor Services. “Sometimes there are special requirements for funeral rites, but by and large, religions see the benefits of donation for families and society and want their members to seriously consider this gift of life when their loved one dies.” Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Friday, March 27, 2015

Family Focus: Wife raises awareness of being a donor

WSOC | Natalie Pasquarella
A local woman wants to raise awareness about the impact of being an organ donor after her husband needed a kidney transplant.

Alexis Hilton donated her kidney to her husband, Steve, and she wants to share her story in hopes of inspiring others to become a donor, too.

The couple said they give thanks every day for their happy, healthy family but in January, they went into surgery together, while their thoughts were on their son, Sam,1.

"Then you think, what's going to happen if something happens to both of us?” Alexis said. “We're both undergoing major surgery."

The Hiltons found out 2 1/2 years ago Steve Hilton's kidneys were failing, and doctors estimated a wait of six years after he was on the transplant list. VIDEO,Continue reading

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You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Kidneys from older patients may help seniors on transplant wait list: B.C. study

Metro News | Thandi Fletcher
A stock photo of hospital staff. Colourbox.com

Older patients in need of a kidney transplant are better off using organs from older deceased donors than waiting for one from a younger donor, suggests new research from the University of B.C.

Although kidneys from older donors can’t provide younger patients with a lifetime of kidney function, they are suitable for older patients who have a shorter life expectancy, the researchers found.

UBC researcher Dr. John Gill, the study’s co-leader, said the findings highlight a need to make it a priority for older patients to have access to older donor kidneys.

“This may involve increased utilization of older donor kidneys or possibly excluding younger patients from receiving these kidneys,” Gill said in a news release. “Older patients derive a survival benefit from rapid transplantation with an older donor kidney, while younger patients do not derive a benefit from transplantation from an older kidney.”

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from Europe and the United States.

The researchers found that, in patients aged 60 and older in need of a kidney transplant, getting an organ from a deceased older donor is superior to waiting for one from a younger donor. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Organ Donation: 6 Myths that Might Change Your Mind about Giving the Gift of Life

Newswise
STONY BROOK, NY, MARCH 27, 2015 – Did you know that one organ donor can save up to eight lives? And that could be extremely helpful given the fact that in New York State alone, over 10,000 people are waiting for organ transplants, according to LiveOnNY (formally the New York Organ Donor Network). More than 8,000 people await kidneys; over 1,300 need livers; and more than 300 need hearts.

On average, 18 people die every day while waiting for organ transplants in the U.S., and every 10 minutes, another name is added to the waiting list. In New York, someone dies every 15 hours waiting for an organ transplant. So what is keeping these patients from receiving the organs they need? Dawn Francisquini RN BSN, Transplant Senior Specialist, Stony Brook University Department of Transplant, says it could be some of the myths her team tries to bust every day.

Myth #1: In order to be a living donor you have to be the same blood type and sex as the recipient.
Answer: “Yes, in order to directly donate to someone you need to be the same or a compatible blood type,” says Francisquini. "However, if you are not the same blood type you can still donate in the paired exchange program.” The paired exchange is comprised of recipients who have living donors who for some reason cannot donate directly to them. The “pair” is put into this “pool” with other recipients and living donors who are in the same situation and essentially a swap is made. For example recipient 1 will receive a kidney from a living donor and in exchange their living donor donates to another recipient in the program.

Furthermore, Francisquini says the sex of a donor does not matter. “A male can donate to a female and vice versa.” When speaking of living donation, a living donor can be a family member, friend or can be an altruistic unknown- they just need to be healthy. Continue reading
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You have the power to SAVE Lives
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As second twin awaits kidney donor, rural Washington family can only wait

Los Angeles Times | MARIA L. LA GANGA
Twins Laynee, left, and Kammie Schneider in their kitchen in Sunnyside, Wash. The girls have to eat a low-sodium diet and stay hydrated because of their kidney disease. (Kaitlyn Bernauer / Yakima Herald-Republic)

When Emily Golladay was told her young daughter needed a kidney transplant, the first thing she thought was, "At least it's not cancer." The second was, "This is fixable."

And she was right. Golladay was the first person doctors tested to see whether she could donate a kidney to Laynee Schneider, her ailing 8-year-old. It was a perfect match.

Seven years have passed, and now, Laynee's twin sister, Kammie, is the one with the bad news. Kammie's kidneys are failing too, irreparably damaged by the same ailment. But this time, all her mother can do is pray.

"I have to watch her go through the same thing Laynee went through, and I can't help her," Golladay said. "That's my frustration. And there are a lot of those days. Then there are the days where you have to sit and go, 'Well, I'm not in control. God's in control. And you have to lay your children at his feet on a daily basis.' Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Southwest Virginia woman donates kidney to co-worker

WJHL | Allie Hinds
Eighteen people die every day in the U.S. waiting for an organ transplant.

When Belvie Morant of Southwest Virginia found out she would be one of hundreds of thousands needing a transplant, she tried to keep it to herself.

Buy Delilah White didn't let that last for long.

On White's first day working at Danville Community College, she remembers meeting a friendly face, Belvie Morant.

'She was the first and only one to come and introduce herself to me, to take me around the campus, to introduce me to other leaders"," White said.

At the time neither realized that relationship would, in a matter of months, be life changing.

"I was very ill, and I was very tired, and my ankles and my entire body were swollen," Morant said.

After many tests, "They told me I would need a kidney transplant."

With 123,000 others waiting for a transplant, doctors told Morant she had only a few months to live. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Berkley resident thankful for new heart, chance to live

Hometown Life | Nathan Mueller
Gary Polk, left, and his wife Tammie will soon be celebrating the one-year anniversary of Gary’s successful heart transplant.(Photo: Nathan Mueller)

BERKLEY – It was more than two years ago when Gary Polk first started feeling the effects of his weakening heart.

At first he was stubborn and avoided getting it checked out, but when he finally did, the news wasn't good. He had 93 percent heart failure, was immediately airlifted to Henry Ford Hospital and learned a new heart would be needed to extend his life.

"The first thing I felt was disbelief," he said. "When they tell you that you have this problem and if you don't get the LVAD (left ventricular assist device) your heart will fail, you don't know what to think."

The 58-year-old Berkley resident was given the LVAD and his name placed on the heart transplant list. He then waited nine months for the call that would eventually change his life, a call that might not have come had someone else or their family not thought about donating their organs. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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First successful European transplant of non-beating heart gives hope to hundreds of patients

Mirror UK News | Louis Smith
Transplant success: First non-beating organ transplant. Getty/PA

In the past surgeons have only been able to use beating hearts taken from people who are ‘brain dead’

British doctors have performed the first successful heart transplant in Europe using a non-beating organ.

In the past surgeons have only been able to use beating hearts taken from people who are ‘brain dead’.

But for this groundbreaking operation the organ came from a donor whose heart had completely stopped.

The new technique could increase the number of hearts available by at least 25% - saving hundreds of lives.

Huseyin Ulucan, who received the donor heart earlier this month, was able to return home after spending only four days in critical care.

The 60-year-old, who suffered a heart attack in 2008, is “delighted” to be recovering well from the successful operation.

He said: “Before the surgery, I could barely walk and I got out of breath very easily, I really had no quality of life. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Doctors worry how organ donations will be affected by Supreme Court ruling on assisted suicide

The National Post | Sharon Kirkey
MP Stephen Fletcher, center, speaks to a throng of reporters in the lobby of the Supreme Court of Canada after it struck down the ban on doctor-assisted suicide Friday February 06, 2015.

As the nation awaits legalized doctor-assisted death, the transplant community is grappling with a potential new source of life-saving organs — offered by patients who have chosen to die.

Some surgeons say every effort should be made to respect the dying wishes of people seeking assisted death, once the Supreme Court of Canada ruling comes into effect next year, including the desire to donate their organs.

But the prospect of combining two separate requests — doctor-assisted suicide and organ donation — is creating profound unease for others. Some worry those contemplating assisted suicide might feel a societal pressure to carry through with the act so that others might live, or that it could undermine struggling efforts to increase Canada’s mediocre donor rate.

“Given the controversy and divided opinion regarding physician-assisted suicide in Canada, I don’t think we are anywhere near being ready to procure the organs of patients who might choose this path,” said Dr. Andreas Kramer, medical director of the Southern Alberta Organ and Tissue Donation Program in Calgary.

“I think there is a legitimate possibility that advocating aggressively for this could compromise the trust that the Canadian public has in current organ-donation processes,” Dr. Kramer said. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
In California:
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Woman who died after giving birth saved lives through organ donation

Irish Times | Marese McDonagh
Sean Rowlette from Dromore West in Sligo with his four children Leanne (8), Abbie (6), Joseph (3) and baby Sally Jnr. His wife Sally died at Sligo General Hospital just hours after giving birth to her fourth child. Photograph supplied by family.

Husband of Sally Rowlette speaks about decision to help others to live after his wife died the day after giving birth to their fourth child

Hours before Sally Rowlette died, her husband, Sean, was sitting by her hospital bed, holding her hand, when he thought of donating her organs .

“We had never discussed it. It just never entered our heads,” says Rowlette. Sally was 36 when she died in controversial circumstances at Sligo Regional Hospital in February 2014. She had given birth to her fourth child the previous day.

Last December a jury found that Sally’s death was as a result of medical misadventure. The publicity was so intense that, unusually, Sean feels that the people who received the organs probably know that Sally was the donor.

“Every day I think: Sally’s not here, but at least there are three people walking around somewhere who would not be here without her, and that does help” said her widow.

Organ Donor Awareness Week begins on Saturday, March 28th, and Rowlette encourages others in his situation to make a decision like the one that has brought great comfort to Sally’s loved ones. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Thursday, March 26, 2015

Lung transplant saves man who had five years to live

St Louis Post-Dispatch | Harry Jackson
Douglas Jones, 68, survived idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, normally a fatal disease.

Douglas Jones, 68, is alive. That’s an accomplishment considering 10 years ago he began having symptoms of what would be diagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

IPF, as doctors call it, has a life expectancy of two to five years because no one knows what causes it, there’s no cure and only minor relief.

Jones survived because in 2009, he got a double lung transplant. He can breathe again, and he has decided not to waste a breath.

“I have a bucket list,” he said. “I want to take glider lessons and fly a glider. I want to sky-dive. I want to learn to paint and play the piano, ride a long zipline. …” A pretty long list.

He and his wife, Carolyn Jones, have turned one of the empty-nest bedrooms into a nursery. Before the transplant, he’d have to stop and catch his breath while ascending stairs. Now Jones can carry his grandchildren up the stairs. Continue reading

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You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Organ Donation as Important as Ever

We are Green Bay | Cole Higgins

HOWARD, Wis. (WFRV) - Next month is National Donate Life Month.
A teacher and a student at one Howard school want people to understand how important it is to be an organ donor.

That's why the student council at Bay View Middle School is hosting a walk to raise awareness and funding for Donate Life Wisconsin.

The tiny orange dot on a Wisconsin driver's license has a huge meaning.

It signals that one has chosen to be an organ donor.

French teacher at Bay View Middle School, Gail Burant, says her family now realizes the impact that small orange dot can have on a family.

"Five years ago this April, Ethan had a liver transplant. When he was born everything seemed perfect. Three months after he was born, we found out that he had a rare liver disease," says Burant.

Burant says Ethan was lucky that his cousin shared his same blood type and qualified to become Ethan's living donor.

However, many who receive organ donations rely on those who have passed away. VIDEO, continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
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Mexican man in need of transplant denied visa by U.S.

The Tampa Tribune | Associated Press
In this May 2, 2014 photo, Jose Chua Lopez, left, holds hands with his mother, Myra Lopez Martinez, during a news conference in Hermosillo, Mexico. Family and friends raised thousands of dollars to send Jose Chua Lopez to the prestigious Mayo Clinic for an urgently needed heart and liver transplant. But the 20-year-old Mexican born with a heart defect has twice been turned down for a U.S. visa, and relatives and his doctor say his life is in danger. (AP Photo/El Imparcial) MANDATORY CREDIT MEXICO OUT

HERMOSILLO, Mexico — A young Mexican who urgently needs a heart and liver transplant has twice been denied a U.S. visa to go to the Mayo Clinic for treatment, he and his family said today.

Jose Chua Lopez, 20, was born with a heart defect and could die if he doesn’t receive the transplants, said his mother, Myra Lopez Martinez.

“My world has fallen down,” Chua said. “This needs to be fixed quickly.”

Martinez said Chua has an appointment at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 10 days, but was turned down for a visa Tuesday by the U.S. State Department for the second time.

The State Department declined to comment specifically on the case, citing confidentiality rules. But spokeswoman Jen Psaki said that “our team is looking into it. So we’ll see if there’s more information they can provide.”


Chua, whose father is an Arizona resident, had a U.S. visa until he was 15. But when it expired, his family didn’t have the money to renew it.

U.S.-based Consejo de Latinos Unidos, an organization that helps uninsured people secure medical care, stepped in to try to help get Chua to the Mayo Clinic. Continue reading]

If you wish to help: Consejo de Latinos Unidos (CDLU) 
Since 2001, the Consejo de Latinos Unidos (CDLU), a not-for-profit public charity, has helped provide emergency and urgent medical care and support for those individuals who are too sick or too young, and have nowhere to turn to.
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Superior Family on a Mission to Raise Awareness for Organ Donation

WDIO
The Beattie family's lives have been forever changed thanks to organ donation. It's almost been three years since little Jackson had his kidney transplant. Ever since the transplant his family has been busy raising awareness, most recently preparing for this year's Duluth Kidney Walk.

Jackson Beattie is one active little boy. He demands to be pushed higher and higher on the swing set, he's quite the baseball player, and he has some impressive jumps on the trampoline.

But Jackson isn't your average four year old. March is National Kidney Month, an important month for Jackson and his family.

"July 12 will be his kidney-versary, as we've been calling it," explained Jackson's dad, Dave.

When Jackson was 20 months old, he had a kidney transplant. His donor is his cousin, Brett.

"Overall, he is doing really well. His kidney is doing fantastically, thanks to Brett," said Sara, Jackson's mom.

Jackson's parents say since the transplant, he's had a few hurdles, but he's doing well and loving life.

"He loves every second of every day. It's just crazy how much energy and happiness that he has for what he goes through," said Dave. VIDEO, Continue reading 
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
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NJ Sharing Network To Expand 5K To Bergen County On April 12

The Bergen Dispatch | Paul Nicols
The signature event for The NJ Sharing Network Foundation is its Annual 5K Celebration of Life, which attracts thousands of participants to New Providence each June to support its mission of saving and enhancing lives through organ and tissue donation.

Growing support of NJ Sharing Network’s mission is why the organization is welcoming a second location for its Annual 5K Celebration of Life, to be held on Sunday, April 12 at Bergen Community College, 400 Paramus Road in Paramus.

The event is a fun-filled, family-oriented day including a 5K walk, music, awards, prizes, and activities for all ages. It is also a great way for people to become involved with National Donate Life Month. National Donate Life Month features an entire month of local, regional and national activities to help encourage Americans to register as organ tissue donors and to celebrate those who have given the gift of life. Continue reading
_________________________________________________________
You have the power to SAVE Lives
We are asking you to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor today.
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Coen Ashton talks to students despite kidney failure

Fraser Coast Chronicle | Eliza Wheeler
Double lung transplant recipient Coen Ashton speaking to Riverside Christian College students last year.Valerie Horton

MARYBOROUGH teenager Coen Ashton has started The Coen Ashton Foundation to help raise awareness and fund research related to cystic fibrosis.

While his health has improved since his double lung transplant in 2012, Coen was admitted to hospital in Brisbane on Friday last week due to "a bit of" kidney failure.

But despite the health scare, he still persuaded his doctors to give him a day pass so he could speak to about 3500 primary school students from around Brisbane as part of a Halogen Foundation Forum.

Sitting in his hospital bed, Coen, 17, told the Chronicle helping raise awareness about the chronic illness he struggled with every day gave him the drive to get out of his hospital bed and get on the stage.

"I think it's the crowd that drives me to get up there and talk to them and make a difference," he said.

"If my life can make a difference to one other person's life then its worth it don't you think?"  Continue reading
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Rare transplant saves life of woman with cystic fibrosis

WNDU | Maureen McFadden

30,000 children and adults in the U.S. are living with cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease that affects the lungs.

For some, a lung transplant is the only hope for survival.

But one woman needed to have her lungs and more transplanted to stay alive.

Kyra Valdez doesn't take a day for granted. A year ago, shopping would have been out of the question for the 26-year-old.

"I could barely walk from my kitchen to my family room,” says Kyra.

She has cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease that affects the lungs. At one point, her lung function dropped to less than 20 percent.

"Because there's so much mucus in your lungs, it's kind of like you're drowning,” says Kyra. “Like you just can't take a deep breath."

Kyra needed a double lung transplant to survive but tests showed she also needed a liver transplant, which is a rare surgery.  Continue reading

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Just-Released National Data Confirm Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford No. 1 in Transplantation

Business Wire 
The transplant program at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford is #1 in the U.S. Liver transplant patients like 9-year-old Braylin Soon, of Portland, OR, are thankful. Braylin, center, and her family are all smiles during a recent visit with some of our transplant team leaders. (Photo: Business Wire)

STANFORD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In newly released 2015 data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, the transplant center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and Stanford Children’s Health is once again confirmed as the national leader in pediatric organ transplantation.
“Stanford’s clinical and research excellence and our 15 outreach locations enable us to perform the most transplants in the nation.”
The organization, which supports ongoing evaluation of the status of solid organ transplantation in the United States, noted the following achievements for the hospital in 2014:
  • No. 1 in pediatric organ transplant volume in the United States, with 91 organs transplanted. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital performs liver, kidney, heart and lung transplants, as well as combined-organ transplants in which two organs, such as heart and lungs or liver and intestine, are given to the same patient in a single surgery.
  • No. 1 in liver transplant volume in the United States. Also, the liver transplant program’s outcomes exceed the national average, with three-year patient survival rates at 100 percent for the last five data-reporting periods.   Continue reading
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