Friday, November 30, 2012

Annual Parade of Lights casts its spell on downtown Denver Read more: Annual Parade of Lights casts its spell on downtown Denver

The Denver Post | Yesenia Robles


A whole carload of clowns frolicked as the parade got under way Friday night. The annual Parade of Lights filed past the illuminated City and County building in downtown Denver Friday night, November 30. 2012. (Karl Gehring / The Denver Post)

Watching the annual 9News Parade of Lights helps put the city in the holiday spirit, but actually being part of the parade is a more exhilarating way to jump into the season.

"I have not been feeling much in the holiday spirit — especially because it hasn't been cold — but being here, putting on the elf costume ... then when Santa walked by, forget about it. I can't wait to go home and wrap Christmas presents," said Jan Von Stein, a volunteer elf who got to be on a float for the first time this year.

"It's like being a kid again."

Von Stein was one of nearly 2,000 participants and volunteer staff members for the 38th annual parade.

The parade, also featuring more than 276,000 lights, 710 pounds of
glitter, five giant balloons and 12 parade floats, crusied through downtown Friday night and will again light up the city at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Another volunteer, Fred Lautenbach, owner of Lautenbach Insurance in Littleton, is participating for the second year, this time on the Toy Box Friends float, after having such a good time last year, he said.

"We had so much fun interacting with the people as you move by, and seeing the expression on people's faces. I mean, it's electrifying," Lautenbach said. "This year we brought more people from our office."

Seven new groups joined the parade this year including the U.S. Air Force Academy Cadet Honor Guard, employees from Denver International Airport, and Donate Life Colorado who along with Donor Alliance, have sponsored a new "Gift of Life" balloon to promote organ donation.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Kind, generous man dies awaiting heart transplant

Sea Coast | By Emily Quirk and Aaron Sanborn


James Kennedy with his wife, Gail. The Kennedy family is grateful for the community’s support since Jim was admitted to the hospital in need of a heart transplant. He died Nov. 25.

EXETER — Waiting in the hospital for nearly a year with the uncertainty as to whether or not you'd get a new heart may cripple most people's hopes. But not James Kennedy. He maintained a positive attitude right up until the end.

Kennedy, 67, died Sunday at Tufts Medical Center in Boston while awaiting a heart transplant.

"You just have to have faith, and I have a lot of it," Kennedy said last week from his hospital bed. "I also have a very strong church community, great neighbors and my wife and family."

Kennedy, a Democrat who served as a District 13 state representative for Exeter from 2006 to 2008, was added to Tufts Medical Center's heart transplant list in 2006. He had been living at the medical center in Boston since Dec. 2, 2011, after a period of declining health.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Wagoner teen’s foresight leaves legacy for many

Muskogee Phoenix | Liz McMahan


WAGONER — Life was going pretty well for Miranda Rice. She was 15 when she got her driver’s permit. On top of that, she was excited to have elected to be an organ donor.

“That way,” she told her grandmother, “if she didn’t live to be old, she would be able to contribute something to others.”

Grandmother Wanda Ross Willhite didn’t give it too much thought — she thought she would be gone long before anything happened to the young, dependable granddaughter she had raised from when Miranda was 3 weeks old.

Things didn’t turn out that way. The beautiful, focused Miranda died Saturday at the age of 19. She was a freshman at Oklahoma State University, studying forensic science on an academic scholarship she earned before graduating from Wagoner High School last spring. She wanted to work for the Federal Bureau of Investigation but had also discovered a special interest in film making.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

EV students turn out in droves to register as donors

MSNBC
East Valley students accepted a challenge this fall to register as organ and tissue donors.

The result was above expectations.

Three student clubs at Mesa’s Dobson High School signed up peers, friends, family members and teachers during the weeklong campaign, organized by the Donor Network of Arizona. Together, they signed up 1,041 people, besting three other high schools in the challenge.

The four participating high schools – Dobson, Basha High School in Chandler, AAEC at Estrella Mountain, and Hamilton High School in Chandler – competed against each other. Together, they registered a total of 1,292 donors.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Cypress native fights kidney failure, raises awareness

Cypress Creek Mirror | Mary Bailey


Photo:Padmaja Vedartham (left), a biology professor at Lone Star College System-CyFair, paints Shoshana Naftel's face at a dodge ball tournament held for her benefit on Nov. 24.

When fighting an uphill battle against a life-threatening illness, some people lose hope for a cure. Cypress native Shoshana Naftel, 24, just does not have time for that.

“I just don’t see myself with a chronic disease,” Naftel said.

Naftel is living with kidney failure, but that is hardly slowing her down. Between her five doctors visits a month and her busy schedule as a sonographer student at Lone Star College System-CyFair, Naftel is fighting for her future.

But it is a race against time.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Catonsville child awaits heart after transplant falls through

Baltimore Sun | Yvonne Wegner


Ann and Ed Bartlinski have adopted five special-needs girls from China. They also have 4 biological children. This is five-year-old Teresa, who needs a heart transplant. (Barbara Haddock Taylor, Baltimore Sun / November 28, 2012)

Teresa Bartlinski prepped for transplant, but heart wasn't ideal match

Five-year-old Teresa Bartlinski was lying unconscious shortly after 3 a.m. Friday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when the doctor told her parents they had called off the heart transplant she was prepped to receive.

The girl — whose Catonsville family enlisted their church, community and global supporters to join them in praying for a miracle healing — remains a top candidate for a heart donation, but this midnight drive from Maryland had been a disappointment.

Dr. Joseph Rossano, medical director for heart transplantation at the Pennsylvania hospital, told Teresa's parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski, that the heart, which came from a child who had died, appeared in an ultrasound to be healthy enough. At the last minute, a surgeon who examined the organ found it was not a good match for Teresa.

"Thank you for being so cautious," Ann Bartlinski told Rossano. "We don't want to take that chance. Our miracle will happen, just not today."
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Driver license staff help in promoting organ donations

Standard Examiner
Editor,

The holiday season is in full swing. This time of year always seems like a good time to reflect on things for which we are grateful. The list often includes family, friends, employment, and freedom. I would like to add to that list; I am grateful for the staff at the Utah Driver License Division.

I work for Intermountain Donor Services, and have the opportunity to meet with driver license employees from time to time. Their job is often thankless. They sometimes have to deny someone a driver license because they did not pass the eye test. Others are turned away because they do not have the correct documentation with them. They are very good at remaining calm and impartial even when the person on the other side of the counter is angry. Keep in mind, they didn’t make the rules; they enforce them. By doing so, they keep us all a little safer, for which we should all be thankful.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Kid Sells Kidney For iPad: 7 Criminals Receive Jail Time For Their Part In Organ Transplant Scheme

iDigital Times


Photo: Would you sell your kidney for an iPad? That's what one Chinese teen decided to do, but renal failure forced him to admit what he'd done in a country that forbids non-family live tissue donations. Find out what will happen to the people who helped organize the kidney transplant for their own gain. (Photo: flickr.com / Tsubaki Kaworu)

The Chinese government really doesn't want people selling their organs to raise money for new Apple gadgets.

According to China's Xinhua News Agency, the state-run official press agency of the People's Republic of China, a number of criminals will now face several years behind bars for helping a 17-year-old student sell his kidney to buy an iPad 2 and iPhone last year.

Out of nine total defendants, seven now face lengthy jail sentences for their role in the removal and sale of the teenager's kidney. The two not facing jail time were found guilty as well, though they are apparently exempt from any sort of punishment as a result of facing lesser charges. The last fact is a bit surprising, largely because the report also claims that all nine were involved enough with the crime's planning/execution to claim a share of the profits.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Heart transplant recipient views old organ for closure, encourages donors

CTV Edmonton News


Photo: Months after receiving a new heart to replace her failing one, Agnes Bolger got the opportunity to see her old organ and come to terms with what caused her pain for years.

It’s something most who have had transplants choose not to do: view their old organ after the operation.

But months after receiving a new heart to replace her failing one, an Edmonton woman was given the opportunity to see her old organ and she chose to say goodbye to what caused her decades of pain.

“It was sick for a long time and this was the reason I was sick for a long time,” Bolger said.

“To me, it’s closure. I know now that the heart I have now is better than what I did (have).”

Pathologist Dr. Atilano Lacson, showed Bolger her old heart, and explained just how sick it was.

“If you can imagine this heart as a pump, the biggest part here of the left ventricle is no longer contracting,” Lacson said.

“(It’s) very, very sick and as Agnes can testify, it must have felt very, very uncomfortable inside her chest with the chest pains and all of that.”
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

World AIDS Day, doctors support HIV organ transplants

WJLA | Steve Chenevy
December first is World AIDS Day and according to a group of doctors, an estimated 1,000 lives could be saved every year if HIV patients were able to donate their organs to other HIV patients.


Now those doctors are calling on Congress to amend the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984. They say it's outdated and needs to be changed immediately.

Thomas Lane recalls his darkest hour 15 years ago-- struggling with HIV and advanced kidney disease. His partner, who does not have HIV, donated his kidney to him in 2000. But nine years later, his body rejected the kidney. Lane’s brother donated a kidney this time.

“I'm feeling really good,” said Lane. “I never expected to be here.”

HIV patients are living longer because of more effective drug regimens. But for many, along with that, comes disease-related kidney and liver failure. It's tough to get a transplant since the waiting list is 100,000 deep.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Kentucky mother to appear on Rose Parade Donate Life float

WDRB
LOUISVILLE, KY. (WDRB) -- The Kentucky mother who lost her daughter and two grandchildren in a horrific winter crash will take her story to California.

Cathy Mattingly will be included on the Donate Life float during this year's Rose Parade before the Rose Bowl. The float, named Journey of the Heart, is lined with 72 memorial portraits of deceased donors.



WDRB 41 Louisville - News, Weather, Sports Community

Carbajal family blood drive returns to Arlington Dec. 1

Arlington Times
ARLINGTON — The Carbajal family is once again working with the Puget Sound Blood Center to provide a community blood drive in Arlington.

On Saturday, Dec. 1, the next Carbajal family blood drive will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Arlington City Council Chambers, located at 238 N. Olympic Ave.

"My family has been asked by LifeCenter Northwest to host a winter blood drive," said Joyce Phillips, one of the Carbajal clan. "My brother Elliot has been selected to be one of the honorees on the Donate Life Rose Parade Float in Pasadena."

Elliot Carbajal was a long-time committed blood donor who died, at the age of 40, five days after a violent assault, when he was taken off life support on his father's birthday, Dec. 16, 2009. His family donated his organs, and has since promoted the causes of organ and blood donation to memorialize him.

Winter Texan Honored with Memorial Portrait on Donate Life Float in 2013 Rose Parade

Equities

SAN ANTONIO, Nov. 28 -- University of Texas System Health Science Center at San Antonio issued the following news release:

In honor of tissue donor and winter Texan Darlene Uecker, Allograft Resources, which is a division of the School of Medicine of the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, is hosting an event in Edinburg on Wednesday, Dec. 5, to finalize the decorating of a memorial floragraph portrait. The floragraph will travel with her family to Pasadena, Calif., to be displayed on the Donate Life Rose Parade Float "Journeys of the Heart" on Jan. 1, 2013.

At the 1 to 2:30 p.m. ceremony, Don Uecker, Darlene's husband, will put the finishing touches on the memorial floragraph, which is a portrait adorned with grains, flowers, seeds, spices and other organic materials. Darlene's floragraph will be one of 72 floral portraits on the Donate Life float. The float honors the lives of organ and tissue donors and the decision they made to give the gift of life by donating their organs, tissues or corneas.

In 2011, the Ueckers, who are residents of Wisconsin, were spending the winter in Alamo, Texas. Darlene Uecker, 74, suffered a cerebral aneurysm and died at Doctors Hospital at Renaissance in Edinburg.

For 24 years, Darlene Uecker worked on the manufacturing of implants in Medtronic's health division. As the recipient of three pacemakers, she learned how the devices worked and knew that implantable devices could improve health and save lives. That knowledge led to her decision to register as a donor.

The 32nd Annual Kidney Ball, Held Nov 17th, Raises $800,000 and 700 Guests

Washington Exec | Srimathi Sridhar
The National Kidney Foundation’s 32nd Annual Kidney Ball, which honored Kennedy Center President and Kidney Donor Michael Kaiser, took place November 17th at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C., bringing out 700 guests and raising $800,000.

“I am so pleased to be involved with the National Kidney Foundation and it was a natural fit to nominate Michael for this honor,” said Honorable Norman Mineta, Vice Chair of Hill & Knowlton and a member of the Kidney Ball Executive Committee. “He is an extraordinary person and I look forward to introducing and presenting the award to him in November.”

Anne Arundel Medical Center Receives Silver Medal Honor for Organ Donation Efforts

Shore Update
Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC) has been awarded the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Silver Medal of Honor for achieving and sustaining national goals for organ donation. AAMC was one of five hospitals in Maryland and 237 nationwide to receive this award.

The criteria for the award includes achieving a donation rate of 75 percent or more of eligible donors, achieving a 10 percent or greater donation after circulatory determination of death and maintaining 3.75 or greater organs transplanted per donor. The achievements indicate that AAMC has integrated practices of donation as part of standard procedures so more lives can be saved through organ transplant donation. Awards were presented for the work done during the time period of April 1, 2010, through March 31, 2012.

“We are honored to have our efforts in organ donation recognized,” says Aimee Yu, M.D., medical director of AAMC’s critical care unit. “We will continue improving our efforts to save and enhance lives through organ and tissue donation.”

More concerns surround Texas transplant programs

KVUE, Austin | ANDY PIERROTTI

AUSTIN -- Rodney Parrish considers himself lucky.

About twenty years ago, both of his kidneys failed. Doctors put him on a transplant waiting list and dialysis to keep him alive. Less than a year later, the husband and father got good news.

“It took less than a year…The fact that I was able to get one so quickly, I mean what can I tell you, as far as my quality of life is concerned, it's immense," Parrish said.

Dr. Charles Andrews helped secure his kidneys as the transplant director for Harris-Methodist Hospital in Fort Worth.

"At one point in the late 1980s, we had the shortest waiting time in the United States for kidney transplants," Andrews said in his Fort Worth office.

Andrews attributes the success to its local transplant program called an ALU, or alternative local unit. Fort Worth is one of six in the state to have the status. It gives patients living in those communities first choice to locally donated kidneys.

"Which meant that all the kidneys procured in Fort Worth, we got first choice in Fort Worth," Andrews said.

Kidney patient may die if deportation goes ahead - UL

Channel 4 News
The home secretary is to decide whether to deport a kidney transplant patient whose life depends on anti-rejection drugs despite claims that deportation would mean certain death. Fatima Manji reports.



Rose Akhalu had never left her home country of Nigeria. She had never even made a journey by flight. Eight years ago for the very first time at the age of 40, she boarded a plane and headed to the UK.

Rose came to study development at the University of Leeds, after receiving a scholarship from the Ford Foundation and a student visa.

She says her aim to was always to return to Nigeria and use her education to try and improve social conditions for women back in Nigeria. She hoped to change her own country, yet she soon found it was her own life that was entirely changed.

Diana among 1,600 New Yorkers waiting for liver transplant

Times Herald-Record | Chris McKenna
Date unclear as demand far exceeds supply Photo: Ed Diana, second from right, plans to keep working until his surgery. He's shown here Oct. 29 at the Emergency Services Center in Goshen.TOM BUSHEY/Times Herald-Record

Orange County Executive Ed Diana's announcement on Wednesday that he needs a new liver puts him in the company of almost 1,600 New Yorkers awaiting liver transplants with varying degrees of urgency.

How long each must wait for a donor with the same blood type and body size is unpredictable. At his news conference, Diana said his call could come any day or might take months, although the wait is often longer. Seventy percent of people needing new livers in New York's transplant region have waited a year or more, and more than a quarter of them have been on a waiting list for at least five years, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

Doctors have scored the severity of each candidate's liver ailment, and the sickest are considered first when a donated liver becomes available.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Baby boomers least likely to donate organs- Canada

EMC News
EMC News - Almost two-thirds of the 1,529 patients waiting for an organ transplant in Ontario are 50 years of age or older. Though older Ontarians are most likely to need a lifesaving organ transplant, only 39 per cent of the 2.5 million registered organ and tissue donors are 50 or older.

Despite common misconceptions, you are never too old to be a donor. In Ontario in 2011-12, almost half of the 222 people who gave the gift of life through organ donation after death were 50 or older, and 11 per cent were 70-plus years old.

Registering as a donor can help prevent unnecessary deaths of Ontarians on the transplant waiting list. Families approached to consider organ and tissue donation almost always consent when they are given evidence of their loved one's registration, while those who decline usually state it is because they are not sure what their loved one would have wanted.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Experimental liver surgery may save baby’s life - Canada

Calgary Herald | BY JAMIE KOMARNICKI
Procedure performed at Alberta Children’s Hospital in Calgary


A three-month-old Winnipeg girl has become the first patient in Canada to receive an experimental and potentially life-saving therapy. Physicians at Alberta Children’s Hospital, led by medical geneticist Dr. Aneal Khan, completed a series of liver cell transplants earlier this month on Nazdana Jan. Photograph by: Supplied , Calgary Herald

CALGARY — The incision, no more than half a pinky long, is just above baby Nazdana Jan’s belly button.

In an experimental procedure performed in Calgary just weeks ago, medical experts inserted an intravenous line through the incision and deep into a blood vessel going straight into the infant’s tiny liver.

Then, over a series of six days, the team infused roughly 10 million transplant cells directly into the organ.

The surgery — the first of its kind in Canada — may just have saved the Winnipeg baby’s life.

“Of course I was a little bit worried, but not that much,” said her father, Jouhar Ali, in an interview at the Alberta Children’s Hospital on Thursday.

“The result is in front of us: she is doing very well.”

Nazdana, born in August, has a urea cycle disorder. The rare genetic disease causes ammonia to build up in the body, which can lead to brain damage and death if untreated. About 50 babies are born each year with the disorder in Canada.

The condition is incurable.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Japanese network featuring Saucier family's gift of life

WLOX | Rebecca Powers


Photo: This emotional meeting in August, when April Beaver got to hear her late son's heart beating on in the chest of Dr. Chuck Shelton, touched people around the world. Now, their story will be featured on the Fuji Network in Tokyo.


A story that first touched hearts right here in South Mississippi is about to be featured on the Fuji Network in Tokyo proving that love is a universal language.

On Wednesday night, a network crew from Japan came to Saucier to meet and interview April and Owen Beaver. They are Caleb Beaver's parents, who got to hear their precious son's heartbeat once again, eight months after his untimely death.

Standing in the Beaver's living room in Saucier, Mitsu Inouye of the Fuji Network said, "So this is a show introducing a lot of those footage, that incredible footage from all over the world."

WLOX's August 16, 2012 story on the Beaver family of Saucier captured Japanese Network Journalist Mitsu Inouye's attention. He was touched by April and Owen Beaver's gift of organ donation and the incredibly moving moment at the Gulfport/Biloxi International Airport, when they met the man who received their teenage son's heart.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Successful organ transplant sparks change in donation law - Korea

The Korea Herald


Photo: Jo Eun-seo, the girl who received transplants of digestive organs, is able to eat solid food after her successful surgery. Four of the seven organs that Seoul Asan Hospital transplanted were not permitted for such surgery at the time, but her surgery led to them being allowed for transplant starting next month. (Yonhap News)

In response to a successful organ transplant for a 6-year-old girl, four additional organs will be added to the transplant list starting next month.

The Ministry of Health and Welfare drew up revised legislation on organ transplants and it passed the Cabinet meeting on Tuesday.

Doctors will be able to transplant the stomach, duodenum, colon and spleen legally after the revision takes effect next month, on the condition that they are transplanted simultaneously with the small intestine.

Before the revision, there were only nine organs legally approved for transplant in Korea. The incident that led to the legislative revision was the surgery of Jo Eun-seo, who was 6 years old at the time.

Jo suffered from chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, a rare disease where the digestive system does not engage in peristalsis, the muscular contractions that occur in the small intestine.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Organ transplant between friends inspires new Maryland legislation

Frederick News Post | Bethany Rodgers


A strange feeling of deja vu stole over minister LaVerne Gill a few months ago as she preached at a church she was visiting for the first time.
Maybe, she joked to the Bethesda congregation, it was because her kidney had been there before.

Gill's kidney first belonged to her friend Pat Hanberry, a Frederick resident who once attended the church. But after Hanberry learned Gill was experiencing renal failure and was facing the prospect of long-term dependence on dialysis, she decided to give the organ to her friend.

Though the two women have found myriad ways to joke about their "kidney connection," Gill said a deep gratefulness lies behind her laughter.

"I think this was a miracle," Gill said of receiving Hanberry's donation. "It was a jolt of life."

Now, state legislation promoting organ donation will bear Hanberry's name. Maryland Sen. Ron Young recently announced that he is proposing statewide changes so that getting a driver's license comes with a presumed consent to organ donation. Those who do not want to be organ donors would have the opportunity to opt out.
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{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

David Orentlicher: Uterus transplants offer women hope

Indy Star | David Orentlicher
Upon the death this week of Dr. Joseph Murray, the first surgeon to perform a successful organ transplant, news accounts reminded us that many people responded critically to his pioneering kidney transplant. He was compared to Dr. Frankenstein and attacked for doing the unnatural. He also was condemned because of the health risks to his patients.

Of course, transplants with kidneys, livers, lungs and hearts are commonly performed today and rarely elicit objection. Yet as surgeons contemplate new types of transplants, we hear criticisms similar to those that greeted Murray in 1954.
Read more
Several years ago, ethicists fretted about face or hand transplants. More recently, uterus transplants have come under fire. So far, only a few physicians have reported performing such transplants, and none of the patients has reported a subsequent pregnancy. But two women received uterus transplants in September, and improvements in technique may make the transplants available more widely.

{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

The gifting life: Dispelling misinformation about organ donors - Canada

Queens Journal | Nick Pateras
Often overshadowed by other charitable initiatives, organ donation is a particularly worthwhile cause and an act that doesn’t receive as much recognition as it warrants. The recent university-wide Queen’s Gives the Gift of 8 campaign which encourages students to become listed as organ donors, helped raise awareness and spark conversation on the important issue of organ donation.

I thought the campaign was tremendously well executed, demonstrating sensitivity on the issue’s delicate nature while also strongly promoting its powerful potential. In educating many students about the practice’s details, I feel the campaign addressed many of the common misconceptions and myths that surround organ donation.

By becoming a donor, you’re able to one day save or enhance the lives of up to eight other people, according to the provincial website for the campaign. Partially due to its opt-in policy on organ donation, Canada has one of the worst organ donor rates in the industrialized world, at just thirteen donors per million people.

Life-saving balloon in Parade of Lights

9News | Blair Schiff
KUSA - This year's Parade of Lights runs on Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 6 p.m.

On hand will be several balloons, including The Gift of Life Balloon, which is sponsored by the Donor Alliance. The balloon symbolizes Colorado and Wyoming residents whose loved ones made the decision to donate organs.

One of the organ recipients include Bill Fleming. He had a heart transplant in 2010, right before his 61st birthday.

Fleming talked about what his experience was like leading up to the surgery.

"I had what they refer to as a 'widowmaker heart attack' on Dec. 5 and unlike what most people tell you to do, I waited five days to go to the hospital. So I spent 156 days between two hospitals. On the morning of May 13, 2010, the day before my 61st birthday, I received the gift of a new heart," Fleming said.


Utica mother discusses departed son's gift, importance of organ donation

Advisor and Source | MEGAN SEMERAZ
Photo: Lynn Parker of Utica glances at a photo of her son, 18-year-old Tim, who was killed in an auto accident in 2007. His family allowed Tim's tissues and seven organs to be donated, helping in more than 150 surgeries. Lynn Parker even has a piece of his bone in her neck.

It was June 16, 2007, the day that changed Utica resident Lynn Parker's life forever. Her son, Tim, who had just graduated from Troy Athens High School, was involved in a serious car accident while driving two friends home from a party when he fell asleep at the wheel - crossing five lanes of traffic and hitting a semi-cab.

Tim was the designated driver for his friends, and about a mile away from home when he fell asleep.

Lynn said her family received the phone call from Beaumont Health Center in Royal Oak at 3:22 a.m. It was a call no parent ever wants to receive.

Tim was unresponsive when his family arrived at the hospital.

Salinas homicide victim donates organs

KSBW | Amy Larson
A Salinas homicide victim donated his organs this week at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center to help save the life of another, family members said.

Devante Nicolas Arias, 19, was washing his white Honda outside a friend's house on the 1000 block of Garner Ave. on Friday when two men walked up and shot him in the head, police Officer Miguel Cabrera said.

Emergency responders said Arias was conscious and breathing when they arrived, and the teen was airlifted in a helicopter to a trauma center. Arias was placed on life support and pronounced deceased on Sunday.

The teenager's family members said Arias donated his organs Tuesday night.

1979 Wildcats rally for fallen classmate

Observer and Eccentric | Cal Stone
Former classmates of Andy Hyde are rallying to raise funds for the late Wildcat's (Class of 1979) children and the Gift of Life Michigan-Organ & Tissue Donation Program with a Dec. 1 event at 10 North in Novi.

“Our class was really tight,” said Cathy Reilly, one of the organizers. “We really reconnected with Andy at our 30-year reunion. He was a great guy, a nice guy.”

Hyde was diabetic and in need of a liver transplant, but succumbed in September before he could get one.

“He still lived in Novi. We had a mini reunion in August. He didn't look well, like something was wrong. Then three weeks later, he was gone. When it happened, we all really wanted to do something for his family,” Reilly said, noting Hyde was divorced with two daughters and piling medical expenses.

Donations are also being taken for the Gift of Life program. Reilly recalled a friend whose father is in a Cleveland clinic right now awaiting a lung transplant. He never smoked a day in his life, but asbestos got to him.

Organ donor found for 10-year-old whose Bay City mother asked motorists to help find a healthy kidney

Michigan | MacKenzie Berger
Colleen Harrison | MLive.com   Tummy Ache Candy Store, 1116 North Johnson Street in Bay City, will be holding a "Free Candy Day" Saturday, Dec. 1 where any donations will go towards Jessica Schwerin's medical bills. Schwerin, (pictured right with her mother Stacey in the background), is a 10 year-old Bay City girl who is in need of a kidney transplant after being diagnosed with kidney failure earlier this year, and has recently found an anonymous donor. She's expecting to have the transplant early January 2013.
BAY CITY, MI — Bay City mother Stacey Schwerin had much to be thankful for on Thanksgiving, a day after receiving a phone call that answered her prayers.

Schwerin, whose daughter Jessica has stage five kidney disease, took matters into her own hands after the 10-year-old was diagnosed with chronic kidney failure in August. The mother staked out a spot along Wilder Road and held a sign asking passersby to help her daughter find a kidney.

On Wednesday, Nov. 21, the phone rang.

The University of Michigan Medical Center "called and said that they had a kidney waiting for us," Schwerin said. "I'm surprised neighbors three houses away didn’t hear me screaming after I got off the phone."

Slain Anniston police officer honored with portrait on float in Rose Parade

Alabama
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- A slain Anniston police officer will be honored as an organ donor with a portrait on a Rose Parade float.

Justin Sollohub - killed in the line of duty on Aug. 24, 2011 -- is one of 72 organ donors who will be celebrated at the famed Pasadena, Calif. Parade on Jan. 1, according to a release from University of Alabama at Birmingham, which is helping sponsor the memorial.

Sollohub was 27 when he was shot to death while pursuing a suspect. Four people received organs from Sollohub.

His mother Jeniffer Morris told UAB they had talked about organ donation as a family.

"We all felt that if someone else could have a second chance at life, we wanted to give that to them," Morris said. "Justin would be proud to know we honored his wishes. I believe he knows we are proud of him for what he accomplished in life as well as death."

Barnes-Jewish Hospital recognized with Donate Life Award

St. Louis American
Barnes-Jewish Hospital was one of two Missouri hospitals recognized with a Donate Life Award for the Mid-America Transplant Services region by the Missouri Hospital Association.

Barnes-Jewish sponsors events that promote organ and tissue donation and transplantation, and several physician champions have been instrumental in improving the hospital’s consent rate of potential organ donors. In 2011, the hospital had 157 tissue donors, which represented a record total and a 30 percent increase from the previous year.

Freeman Health System in Joplin also was recognized with a Donate Life Award.

'Tis the season of giving and hope: Being an organ donor = giving = hope!

Organ & Tissue Donation Blog

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Canton-based MatchingDonors.com honored as ‘Nonprofit of Choice’

Canton Citizen


(L-R) Wayne Morris, MTV producer; Rob Micai, Disney & Nickelodeon producer; Joel Pratt, MatchingDonors. com director of business relations; Jen Micai; Alan Donnes, president/CEO of National Lampoon; Jay Leno; Paul Dooley, MatchingDonors CEO/founder; Wally Towner, MatchingDonors director of patient relations

Canton-based MatchingDonors.com was recently honored again as the “Nonprofit of Choice” by the Hollywood Film Awards in Beverly Hills at the 16th annual Hollywood Awards Gala. MatchingDonors was chosen from over 1.5 million nonprofit organizations in the United States.

“We were thrilled to be chosen this second consecutive year for this honor,” said Paul Dooley, CEO and founder of MatchingDonors.com.

MatchingDonors.com has become the largest and most successful nonprofit organization in the world that is finding living altruistic organ donors for patients needing transplants.

The Hollywood Film Awards Gala ceremony took place at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills on October 22. The event honors cherished stars and up-and-coming talent, and traditionally kicks off the film awards season with the biggest A-list stars and top industry executives in attendance.

While in Hollywood, Jay Leno, a great supporter of MatchingDonors.com, invited the MatchingDonors team to the NBC Tonight Show and met with them after the show to thank them for the great work they are doing.

Tuxedos worn by the MatchingDonors team at the Hollywood Awards Gala were provided by Richard Lewis Formal Wear in Canton.
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East Valley students recruit organ, tissue donors

NBC Local News, Phoenix, AZ
East Valley students accepted a challenge this fall to register as organ and tissue donors.

The result was above expectations.

Three student clubs at Mesa’s Dobson High School signed up peers, friends, family members and teachers during the weeklong campaign, organized by the Donor Network of Arizona. Together, they signed up 1,041 people, besting three other high schools in the challenge.

The four participating high schools – Dobson, Basha High School in Chandler, AAEC at Estrella Mountain, and Hamilton High School in Chandler – competed against each other. Together, they registered a total of 1,292 donors.


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Donate Life? A Heart Donor's Sister Finds Comfort in Someone Else's Gift

Family Goes Strong | PAMELA CYTRYNBAUM


SOURCE: PHOTO FROM LYNN HUNTER. After heart transplant surgery, here's the heart Lynn wears as a reminder of her journey.

When your loved one is the organ donor, transplant surgery means agony for you, joy for the other family on the other side

"I'm crying today because I know that on this day, one year ago, a family lost a precious loved one. And, in the midst of their grief they had the strength to give me the gift of life. I don't know who they are but may God bless them for giving me back a life free of pain. A life where I don't have to fight for every breath I take. Their daughter is my angel and I will try to honor her every day of my life."

Lynn Hunter wrote this, about what it means to donate life. Lynn is a Virginia mom in her mid-40s whom I've never met – I've never even talked to her on the phone. I don't think I could bear even to hear her voice. But what she's written has offered the only comfort I have found about the very unique and lonely pain of having your loved one be a heart donor. My family was on the other end.
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How World War II led to organ transplants, and other life-saving inventions

Yahoo News | Julian Gavaghan
Dr Joseph Murray, who has died at the age of 93, may never have pioneered organ transplants without the bloody battles of World War II. But war also led to plastic surgery, vaccines and better use of antibiotics.


Press Association - Dr Joseph Murray's work on soldiers injured in the D-Day landings moved medicine forward

He spent a lifetime trying to save lives - but Dr Joseph Murray, who has died at the age of 93, may never have pioneered organ transplants without the bloody battles of World War II.

The Nobel prize-winning surgeon learned his craft by performing skin grafts on horrifically burned soldiers returning to the U.S. after the June 1944 D-Day landings.

Dr Murray, who served as a First Lieutenant, realised the common rejection of tissue might pose a problem with organ transplants as well.

He later began experimenting by transplanting kidneys on dogs and human twins, who are perfect donor matches.

In 1962, he performed the first successful kidney transplant using a kidney from a donor unrelated to his patient with the use of immunosuppressive drugs.

Dr Murray’s medical innovation is just one of many lifesaving techniques that were born out of the competition to kill.
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The amazing gift that can transform a stranger's life - UK

This is Nottingham
BARRY Evans sat by the telephone and cried in disbelief when a nurse rang him to say he was a match for a kidney that had just been donated.

He knew the significance of the conversation could spell an end to more than six years of pain, which had seen him unable to exercise, balloon in weight and sink into depression.

It was back in 2006 when he'd just landed his dream job and married the love of his life that he found out his kidneys were failing.

Then came that phone call. "I burst into tears on the phone. I couldn't believe this was happening to me, and that someone could be so generous. No one will ever understand the pain – I knew this news meant I could get my life back," said the 34-year-old, of St Michael's Street, Sutton-in-Ashfield.

He was only 27 years old when the first signs of his condition appeared, while he was taking schoolchildren from Manor Academy, in Mansfield Woodhouse – where he had just been employed as a maths teacher – on a camping trip.

His ankle swelled with fluid and became too painful to bear any weight, so he was admitted to hospital but initially given painkillers and sent home.

It was only hours later when he couldn't stop vomiting and was taken to hospital for a second time, that medics ran a series of tests and discovered his kidneys were failing.
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After long wait, Kimberly woman to undergo kidney transplant

Post Crescent | Kyle Daly


Stephanie Henderson (right) spends part of her last day at work transitioning work assignments with colleague Rhonda Lopez on Tuesday at Thrivent Financial in Appleton. Henderson bought a billboard last year to help her find a kidney donor that she is receiving today. / Dan Powers/The Post-Crescent

It started with a single comment — a joke, really.

Kimberly resident Stephanie Henderson, who had been diagnosed with kidney failure in 2004, was leaving Galvan’s Restaurant in Appleton after having lunch with friend and co-worker Connie Jensen. It was late 2010, and after years of no luck finding a kidney donor, Henderson quipped that maybe she should put up a billboard.

She did, and the national media attention the U.S. 41 billboard generated — with assistance from a nonprofit organization that pairs kidney donor-recipients — helped Henderson find a compatible organ. Henderson will undergo transplant surgery today in Milwaukee.

“Prayers have been answered,” Henderson said.
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Remembering Dr. Joseph Murray, a surgeon who changed the world of medicine

Harvard Health Publications | Anthony Komoroff


On Monday, Dr. Joseph E. Murray passed away at age 93. A long-time member of the Harvard Medical School faculty, Murray pioneered the field of organ transplantation. This great achievement, for which he was honored with the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1990, has given the gift of life to hundreds of thousands of people destined to die young. But his success did not come easily.

How many people do you know who try to achieve something that no one has ever before even attempted, because it was judged to be impossible? And keep trying, and keep failing, but still keep trying—for a decade? And do so despite having each failure seriously criticized by many peers? I’ve only known one such person: Murray. He would not quit.

When he returned to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston after serving as a plastic surgeon in World War II, Murray became the surgical leader of a team whose goal was to achieve human organ transplantation, starting with the kidney. Almost all of us are born with two kidneys, and appear to need only one. The other is like an insurance policy. If you take a kidney from a healthy person (the donor), it can be given to someone with two diseased kidneys (the recipient).

The idea behind kidney transplantation was simple. Actually doing it required solving immense problems. How do you hook up the recipient’s blood vessels to the new kidney? What about the nerves and lymph vessels? Where do you put the new kidney? Do you leave the two ailing kidneys in place or remove them? Murray solved those problems and others through studies in animals.

But the seemingly insurmountable problem for organ transplantation was rejection of the transplanted organ. To the recipient’s immune system, the new kidney “looks” foreign. It is treated as an invader, attacked, and ultimately killed. The only exception would be if the donor was genetically identical to the recipient.
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First 'breathing lung' transplant in US performed at UCLA

ABC7  Los Angeles | Denise Dador

LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A local man became the first in the country to receive a "breathing lung" transplant in mid November. A team of doctors and nurses at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center were able to keep a set of donor lungs alive and breathing outside of the body as they're transported into the operating room.

Experts said it's a medical breakthrough that could save thousands of people who die every year waiting for a transplant.

A condition called pulmonary fibrosis was slowly hardening the lungs of 57-year-old Fernando Padilla of Alta Loma. He was tethered to his oxygen tank, hoping for a lung transplant.

"I thought it was pneumonia, I thought it was bronchitis. Nothing ever entered my head that my lungs were messed up," Padilla said. "I couldn't do nothing. I had to have everybody doing things for me."

The longtime construction worker, who helped build the very hospital he was staying in, wanted to do more. He volunteered to be part of a new clinical trial examining the delivery of living lungs.

During transport, the organ was infused with blood and oxygen, allowing them to breathe on their own.

"It maintains the donor lungs outside of a human body on a box in a near physiologic state," said Dr. Abbas Ardehali, the director of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center heart and lung transplant program.

Diana has liver disease, requires transplant

Times Herald Record | Chris McKenna
Orange County Executive Ed Diana announces that he needs a liver transplant during a news conference at the Orange County Emergency Services Center in Goshen on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012. His wife Mary Diana, center, and his daughter Danielle Diana-Smith were seated at the table during the news conference.TOM BUSHEY/Times Herald-Record

GOSHEN — Orange County Executive Ed Diana announced Wednesday that he's suffering from a liver disease that requires him to get a liver transplant and could take him out of office for up to 10 weeks while he recovers from surgery.

Flanked by his wife, his daughter and a doctor at a news conference, Diana told reporters that his ailment, known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, has caused his liver to deteriorate, but that he feels fine and plans to continue working until he undergoes surgery. He said he's on a waiting list for an organ donation and doesn't know when a match is likely to be found.

Diana said he decided to reveal his condition to quell rumors about his health and avoid surprising the public with the news that he has been hospitalized for a liver transplant, whenever that day comes.

“Let me assure that I feel well, I feel great,” he said.

Ahmedabad: Recipients of the organs thank 15 families for new lease of life - India

Daily Bhaskar
Ahmedabad: Around 15 donor families who donated the organs of their deceased loved ones were felicitated by the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) at Civil Hospital.

Recipients of the organs also expressed their gratitude to the families for helping them give a second chance at life.

In an emotionally-charged atmosphere, several donor families were overcome with tears as they narrated their decision to donate the organs of their loved ones.

The donors cut across barriers of caste and class. A neurosurgeon and the son of a labourer both shared the platform after they decided to donate the organs of their brain dead fathers.

Speaking on the occasion, Dr HL Trivedi, director of IKDRC said that cadaver transplant remains a big challenge. The institute has carried out 300 cadaver donations so far.

“Across the world, 80% transplants happen through cadaver donation while in India 80% of it happen through live donations. There is a need to reverse this trend,” said Dr Trivedi. He also said that soon pancreas transplant will also be possible at the insistute and in future even heart and limb transplant may be taken up.

Steven's Hope event energizes supporters to continue group's good works

Contra Costa Times | Suzanne Sproul
It is an hour designed to both inspire and engage people to help change a life, maybe even their own.

And it's a powerful testimony to a family's faith and love in believing there is always hope even in times of despair. Three hundred people recently listened quietly to a story about a little boy who only lived 32 hours, but whose life has impacted many. It was his story that highlighted the fifth annual "There is Hope" fundraising luncheon for the Upland-based Steven's Hope.

It is the most important 60 minutes of the year for the group.

"It gives us an opportunity to let our supporters know what we have accomplished and where we want to go next year," said Tony Cappelli, president and executive director, in the event's invitation.

Doctors told parents Tony and Sandy Cappelli the sad news early in her pregnancy that their son, Steven Joseph Cappelli, had a fatal heart defect. The Upland couple decided to continue with the pregnancy in hopes of donating his organs. That wasn't possible, but the legacy of his short life lives on, now 12 years later, in Steven's Hope, the nonprofit organization the Cappellis established in his memory.

Today, the organization continues to help families coping with living with an injured or seriously ill child. Steven's Hope provides financial support and housing to those families, but more importantly it serves as a support network in what is usually a lengthy ordeal.

Heartfelt Exchange of a 'Dusty' Heart

Newport Beach -Corona del Mar, CA Patch | By Nisha Gutierrez-Jaime
Newport Beach retired attorney Dennis Harwood meets the wife and son of Vance "Dusty" Atkinson, whose donated heart saved Harwood's life more than 20 years ago.

Debbie Atkinson hadn't heard her husband's heartbeat since his death more than 20 years ago. But today she laid her head on the chest of Dennis Harwood and heard it quietly pumping away.

Harwood, 74, a retired attorney, has defied the odds of survival thanks to the strong heart of Debbie's husband, Vance "Dusty" Atkinson. Dusty was a long-haired, tattooed, Harley-Davidson-loving man who suddenly died at age 32 from a brain aneurysm in 1992. On Wednesday, Harwood and Dusty's wife and son Nick met for the very first time in an emotional encounter at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian's Heart & Vascular Institute in Newport Beach.

"I never thought I would hear that again. It was so nice to hear it beat, very calming," Debbie Atkinson said while fighting back tears. "He wasn't ready to give up yet. His heart wanted to continue on."

And that's exactly what it has been doing all of these years.


Daughter gives the gift of life

Tri-City Times | Catherine Minolli
DRYDEN — Thanksgiving was extra-special this year for Sharon Wright.

The 64-year-old longtime resident was given a most beautiful gift—the gift of time, for which she is abundantly grateful.

Time was becoming an enemy to Sharon. In January, she'd been diagnosed with end stage liver disease, the result of an autoimmune disorder that attacked the life-giving organ. Sharon's physical well-being was declining—and fast.

Her only hope would be a liver transplant, but with so many others waiting for an organ donation, Sharon's chances of becoming a recipient were slim.

"The doctors told us the only option would be to find a live donor," daughter Jessica Allison says. "They suggested we could try to find a family member or a friend, get blood tests done for compatibility and go from there."

So that's exactly what Jessica did—after some convincing. After discovering she was a match, Jessica approached her mom with the idea of being the donor.

AHS and THS promote “Donate for Life”

Fort Bend Southwest Star Newspaper
Shown are The Austin Angels and Travis Bells.
Organ, eye and tissue transplants offer patients a new chance at healthy, productive and normal lives, and return them to their families, friends and communities. You have the power to change someone’s world by being a donor. It’s about living. It’s about life. This is what was promoted during the 5th Annual Tracie Hester Walk for Life at Austin High on Saturday, November 10.

Tracie Hester Life Donor Walk hoped to bring more awareness to this issue. The event started with a little history about Tracie Hester and her legacy by Mrs. Betsy Heathcock, the former director of the Austin Angels and Tracie’s teacher. The audience also got to watch an amazing performance by the Austin Angels and Travis Belles to the song, “One More Moment”. The sister of Mrs. Ashlee Williamson, the assistant director of the Austin Angels, let the audience know firsthand how a donor donation can change your life. Without one, she would not have been able to tell her story. It just so happens that she was involved with the Austin Angels during Tracie’s tenure. This year, the audience was treated to a special performance by Jack Wolff, a 12 year dancer with the Precision Dance Academy. He danced to Bruno Mars’ “Talking to the Moon.”

Oklahoma Mother Channels Grief Into Helping Others

News on 6, Tulsa, Oklahoma | Craig Day
Corban's mom said her little boy, whose name meant "a gift to God," was so loving to everyone, but now he is with God.

Elly Griffin dropped off a car load of toys at the Salvation Army Distribution Center off 11th Street between Yale Avenue and Sheridan Road.

They'll be given out to families so children will have something to open on Christmas morning.

The dozens of toys will bring lots of smiles, and a special feeling to Griffin's heart, still hurting as she grieves a tragic loss.

With his cute smile and dazzling blue eyes, Corban Lyon walked early and was all boy.

"He was everywhere," his mother Elly Griffin said. "He had so much energy; it was crazy."

The name Corban means "a gift to God."

Corban's mom said her little boy who was so loving to everyone, is now with God.

He drowned on his second birthday in September.

NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Alex O'Loughlin Fans for Donate Life Change of Ownership

Alex O'Loughlin Fans for Donate Life

A FAREWELL TO SABINE ATKINS 

In September of 2009, Sabine Atkins (pictured here wearing her colours for national "wear blue and green for Donate Life" day, held last year) with the assistance of the The German Alex O'Loughlin Fan Club, created the Alex O'Loughlin Fans for Donate Life website.

Since then the site has grown exponentially until it has become what you see today, a truly international affiliation of Alex O'Loughlin Fans, and Donate Life supporters, who have united for a common cause - encouraging the gift of life.

None of this would have possible without Sabine's tireless efforts in raising awareness of the desperate need for more registered organ donors, and her dedicated support of the transplant community.

Please join us and welcoming Claire Eyles. 
To Sabine, we express our gratitude for all that you do in raising awareness for donation and that our paths will cross in the future.  Best wishes for much success in your writing endeavors.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Lung transplant patient Coen Ashton due leave hospital today

Sunshine Coast Daily| Hannah Busch


Maryborough teen Coen Ashton in Prince Alfred hospital after a long-awaited double-lung transplant. Contributed Photo.

MARYBOROUGH organ donation campaigner Coen Ashton is due to be discharged from his Melbourne hospital today after weeks of recovery from a double-lung transplant.

The 15-year-old has cystic fibrosis and ran a campaign to get 1000 people to sign up as organ donors in 2010, a move that gained national recognition.

His family continues the campaign from the website coenashton.com.au and announced the discharge on the campaign's Facebook site.

Coen underwent the life-changing surgery about a month ago.

The family will return to their Granville home later next year.

Visit facebook.com/coenashton to stay updated on his progress.
Story source
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Ottawa heart institute reaches 500 transplants with three-operation ‘heart trick’

Ottawa Citizen | Don Butler


Photos taken of a heart transplant procedure at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute between November 19-23. credit: Vincent Lamontagne, University of Ottawa Heart Institute.

Talk about an exclamation mark.

Late last week, the University of Ottawa Heart Institute performed the 500th heart transplant in its history. And it reached the milestone by completing three of the life-saving operations in 24 hours, including back-to-back transplants early Friday morning.

That’s never happened in the 28 years the heart institute has been doing transplants. Equally amazing, Dr. Marc Ruel, chair of the institute’s transplant committee, was the main surgeon on all three of the operations.

“Two the same day is not uncommon,” said Dr. Thierry Mesana, the heart institute’s chief of surgery. “But three in 24 hours — and two back-to-back during the same night — that’s a tour de force.”

In an interview, Ruel downplayed his role and deflected credit to the surgical team and Dr. Vincent Chan, one of the institute’s gifted young surgeons, who assisted with the second and third transplants.

“My job was probably the easiest,” he said. “Without Dr. Chan, without the team, those three transplants would not have been possible.”

The first of the three operations began around 4 a.m. last Thursday and ended about six hours later. The second began late Thursday night and was just wrapping up around 4 a.m. Friday when the third operation began.
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Murray is remembered as a ‘giant’ in organ transplantation

Boston Globe| Chelsea Conaboy


BILL POLO/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2004
Dr. Joseph E. Murray performed the first successful organ transplant on Dec. 23, 1954, at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston.

Soon after surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital listed their first patient in an organ donation database as in need of a face transplant, Dr. Bohdan Pomahac visited Dr. Joseph E. Murray at his home in Wellesley.

Pomahac, who was preparing to lead a team in the hospital’s first partial face transplant and would go on to do the first full face transplant performed in the United States, was anxious. Had he considered every variable? Had they done enough to ensure the surgery would go well?

Pomahac knew Murray would understand. In 1954 in an operating room at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Murray had performed the first successful organ transplant, transferring a kidney between identical twins. He received the 1990 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in transplantation, a field he helped to define.

Murray, who died Monday after suffering a hemorrhagic stroke at home on Thanksgiving, told Pomahac then that he was well prepared. Not every doubt could be settled, he had said. Pomahac should push forward.
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Free Educator Resource Kit Brings Donor Education to the Classroom

PRWeb
“Together We Can Save Lives” helps teachers and teens understand and discuss organ, eye and tissue donation.

Columbus, OH (PRWEB) November 27, 2012. Working with Ohio educators and regional organ procurement organizations, the Ohio Department of Health’s Second Chance Trust Fund has developed a resource kit for teachers, “Together We Can Save Lives.” The kit, now available at DonateLifeOhio.org and the Donate Life Ohio Facebook page, offers content and activities across subjects designed to provide high school students with the knowledge needed to make informed decisions about registering as organ, eye and tissue donors.

“An Ohioan dies every other day when a lifesaving transplant doesn’t come in time,” said Dr. Theodore Wymyslo, director of the Ohio Department of Health. “Even with more than five million Ohioans registered as organ, eye and tissue donors, there are still more than 3,500 awaiting transplants. This resource kit will equip teens with the facts about donation, and help them understand the life-saving impact they may have as a registered donor. When asked, ‘Do you want to register as a donor?’ by the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, teens and their families can make an informed decision.”

“Together We Can Save Lives” was designed keeping in mind the Ohio Academic Content Standards and National Health Education Standards, and desired student objectives for each standard are included. The resource kit provides:

Connections to 21st Century Skills
Ohio Content Standards Applications
Free, interactive teaching aids such as video, PowerPoint presentations, handouts and quizzes
Classroom activities, including discussion questions and corneal blindness glasses

This Educator Resource Kit is available to high schools statewide and was made possible by the Second Chance Trust Fund within the Ohio Department of Health. The Second Chance Trust Fund works to help solve the critical shortage of organ, eye and tissue donors through education and awareness. The Fund is supported by a voluntary $1 donation made when a person obtains or renews an Ohio driver’s license or state identification card from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV).

Educators may download a copy of the kit from the Donate Life Ohio Website (Educator Resource Kit: "Together We Can Save Lives"), or contact a local Donate Life Ohio representative to request a hard copy.

ABOUT DONATE LIFE OHIO

Donate Life Ohio is a coalition of the state’s organ, eye and tissue recovery agencies dedicated to educating Ohioans about the need for organ and tissue donation. In this effort to increase donor registrations, they are joined by the Ohio Department of Health, the Ohio Department of Public Safety and the Minority Organ and Tissue Transplant Education Program. For more information, please visit http://www.DonateLifeOhio.org.

ABOUT SECOND CHANCE TRUST FUND

Through contributions made by individuals at Ohio’s BMVs while receiving or renewing their Ohio driver’s licenses or state identification cards, the Second Chance Trust Fund finances educational and action-oriented campaigns like the Green Chair campaign. A $1 contribution supports donation education in Ohio and gives hope to thousands of Ohioans waiting for a second chance through organ, eye and tissue donation.

CONTACTS WITH OHIO ORGAN PROCUREMENT ORGANIZATIONS

LifeCenter Organ Donor Network, Cincinnati
Andi O’Malley, Director of Public Affairs
513.558.5555 office / 513.315.1785 cell

Lifebanc, Cleveland, Akron, Canton, Youngstown
Heather Mekesa, Director of Hospital and Community Services
216.752.5433 office / 216.392.1098 cell

Lifeline of Ohio, Columbus
Marilyn Pongonis, Director of Communications
614.384.7330 office / 614.580.0393 cell

Life Connection of Ohio, Dayton
Cathi Arends, Director of Community Relations
937.223.8223 office / 937.657.5596 cell

Life Connection of Ohio, Toledo
Kara Steele, Director of Community Relations
419.893.1618 office / 419.367.9958 cell

Melissa Carney
melissa.carney@fahlgren.com
216.298.4676
Email Information

{Register to be an organ,eye and tissue donor. To learn how, www.donatelife.net or www.organdonor.gov}

Swansea woman survives 2 major transplants with husband by her side

Herald News | Deborah Allard


Herald News Photo | Jack Foley
A year after a pancreas transplant, and several years after her husband gave her a kidney, Dawn Manchester of Swansea is thrilled to be alive. “I have a new life.” she says.

“You know someone loves you when ...”

Dawn Manchester trailed off from her tale of love, sacrifice and survival.
The words she left unspoken are known intimately between she and her husband, Richard, her perfect match, not just in love but in blood and tissue.

Manchester, who came very close to death, received a kidney from Richard, and in the process became a new woman with an important mission.

Manchester had always been healthy, never even suffering chicken pox as a child. But, at 22 she became a severe diabetic. Manchester was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, the type usually diagnosed in children.

Doctors had no answer as to why she had so suddenly become insulin-dependent.

Having diabetes was a crushing blow. Manchester, who had family problems and had already been on her own for six years, suddenly found herself administering six shots a day to keep her blood sugar in check.
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