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Nation's First: Intermountain Medical Center Uses Revolutionary Approach to Address Organ Shortage Problem

NEWSWISE | Intermountain Medical Center

Credit: Intermountain Medical Center.  There's new hope for patients with liver disease who are waiting for a donor liver to become available for transplantation. Doctors at Intermountain Medical Center have found a way to safely use a damaged liver to replace a dying liver, then cure the damaged liver of its disease.
Newswise — There's new hope for patients with liver disease who are waiting for a donor liver to become available for transplantation. Doctors at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City have found a way to safely use a damaged liver to replace a dying liver, then cure the damaged liver of its disease.

Intermountain Medical Center is the first transplant center in the nation to use a revolutionary approach for saving the life of patients who are on death’s door.

This year over 13,000 people will be added to the liver transplant waiting list of around 17,000 people; however only 7,000 received a transplant in 2016. This creates an enormous supply--demand mismatch and results in about 1,500 people dying each year while waiting and another 1,700 being removed for getting too sick before they see their opportunity.

“We’re excited about the possibilities this opens when it comes to providing life-saving treatment to some of the sickest patients waiting for a liver transplant,” said Richard Gilroy, MD, medical irector of the Liver Transplantation Program at Intermountain Medical Center. “We are able to make what were felt damaged goods work and sometimes far better than we ever thought we could. This outcome means more people can be saved before they get too sick and allows them to move back to an active life sooner.” Continue reading

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