A 2nd Life for Risky Kidney Transplants?

HEALTH DAY
THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Philadelphia doctors say they cleared hepatitis C infections in 10 patients who received kidneys from deceased donors who had the virus.

The findings suggest hundreds more of these transplants could take place each year, thus reducing wait time for a lifesaving kidney, the doctors said.

"Our pilot data demonstrate the ability to cure the contracted virus following transplantation in this patient population," said the study co-leader, Dr. David Goldberg.

"If future studies are successful, this may be a viable option for patients who may otherwise never see a transplant," added Goldberg, an assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

In the United States, more than 97,000 people need a kidney transplant. Many must wait for five or more years, the researchers said in background notes.

Kidneys from donors with hepatitis C have been considered unsuitable. But, in 2016, researchers at Penn Medicine began investigating the effectiveness of transplants from donors with hepatitis C. Continue reading
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